Tag Archives: gita

U.P. THE LAND OF SUPERNORMAL ROLE MODELS

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    In the complex understructure of India, UP sits like her invisible heart and spiritual voice. One can also address her as a headstrong folklore and tradition champion. Indeed the most populated state that celebrates its lineage in its diversity. It has an irrefutable matrix of society that hails, from two major communities, the Hindus and the Muslims—both passionate lovers of their native.

    Even though, the expanse of Hinduism resonates much beyond India and goes right up to the global frontiers. UP has always been its formidable pillar in the ever lengthening axis. Rather, it has been the primordial hub of religiosity since time immemorial. If we deconstruct her, she expands to a vast region much before it was converted into administrative hedges like states and districts. Which, Gods loved and nature adored. So, one can say she has been the showcase, the playground and even the reliable archives of Hinduism since grand old times.

    She doesn’t require administrate boundaries to conjoin. As, she, connects, consolidates and even identifies herself in many other ways. To begin with she is the mix of Pancha Bhoota—where the elements of Prithvi (Earth), Jal (Water), Agni (fire), Vayu (air) and Akash (ether or the sky) combine for her cosmic creation.

    If we translate this into ground realities we find. Starting from the texture of the soil, to the pitch of the lingo it is one. It has no less than Gods and super humans, as its role models. To say, some of its role models are even better known than the land they belong to won’t be a misnomer. And they all performed their incredible leelas in this very soil. We will come to that a little later.

    UP has that enduring fix of festivals, along with bucolic handholding and even similarity in cereal crops to live and breathe in congruence. There is no life without water they say and water forms the lifeline of any society. To that effect there are vaguely a series of some six or seven imposing rivers, leaving aside many small ones that almost run parallel but certainly from the western side of the state to the eastern corner. And finally,   they all merge as tributaries with Ma Ganga. The main stem of Ganga, begins with the confluence of Bhagirathi and Alaknanda rivers in the town of Devprayag in Uttara Khand. As per mythology she was brought to earth by king Bhagiratha, where, eventually she grew up to the status of Ma Janani in the vast expanse of the state. She is indeed the queen mother of all the water bodies as she carries along with her almost all the rivers. Therefore, for certain she can be called the icon of motherhood the provider—an unbeatable role model again. So blessed is the state that there is hardly a district or a town that is not within the easy catch of a river. Where, inhabitants even identify themselves with the rivers, such as ‘Sarjupari’—person living across river Sarju. There are many annual melas that connect the rural fraternity and its vendors across the sub-regions like Ballia and Nauchandi, to name a few.

    Hinduism has four ashrams when it comes to completing a lifetime—Brahamcharya, (Balkal … Birth to student like), Grihasta (householder), Vanaprastha (retired) and Sannyasa (renunciation). The holy land of UP connects you to some quintessential examples of how some incarnations or avatars of Maha Vishnu have spent their time in these defined ashrams. Hinduism doesn’t come through, without UP. And all lessons of life are available here.

    It teaches us, nothing is easy and everything needs to be fought for, whether you’re an incarnation of God or just a human form. Even, when, Lord Krishna was the 8th incarnation of Maha Vishnu. Mathura was under turmoil at least the night little Krishna was born in Dwaparyuga (the 3rd Yuga). He demonstrated the victory of good over evil when he killed his maternal uncle Kans. And by lifting the Goverdhan Parvat he proclaimed nothing is impossible if you are hell bent upon doing it. On bhakti (devotion) no one can beat Radha as a role model and it all happened in the Braj Bhoomi that is now divided into many districts. But Krishna leela has no boundaries.

    In the same land Bhagwan Sri Ram was born in Ayodhya as the 7th incarnation of Maha Vishnu in Treta Yuga (2nd yuga). Although, he was born before Krishna I’m describing him after Krishna because he had a steady childhood, whereas, Krishna had a fighting one. But Sri Ram exemplified himself as Maryada Purshottam—the quintessential example of respecting contemporary times and fairness accentuating into super goodness. He had many mid life crises which he fought through valiantly all by himself and his devoted team. Prime was 14 years of Banvas (exile into forest) and the abduction of his wife by Ravana. Where, on the one hand he did show grief but on the other hand as a true karmyogi he found his bearings and organized himself to fight the great battle of Lanka to get his wife back. But while doing so he ensured he didn’t overstep the laid down tenets of science and its concomitants, even, when, he was an avatar of Lord Vishnu. Today, Sri Ram is a household name and a role model that is not confined to any district or a religion and where his queen Sita is an epitome of devotion. His entire leela happened along the plains of river Saryu and the famous kingdom of Ayodhya where he ruled. Important to say—role models can be followed by any person from any religion or sect.

    Further, the great war of Mahabharat too, had its roots in Hastinapur near Meerut, again in UP. A well known mythological story of intensely disagreeing, blood thirsty royal cousins, that eventually escalated into a holy war. It is said, what is not seen and read in Mahabharat doesn’t exist in the world. It has again given many role models to the world while it was fought in Dwaparyug. It had many stalwarts. Some important names that one can immediately reflect upon are Krishna, Yudhistir, Bhishma Pitamah, Dronacharya, Kripacharya, Kunti, Karan, Yudhistir, Bhimsen, Arjun, Nakul, Sahdev, Draupadi, Veer Abhimanyu to name a few.

    Krishna derives his umbilical and founding legacy from Braj Bhoomi. From where he goes on to recite those ultimate verses of Gita, that is destined to happen, only once-in-a-planet-time, to a tranced Arjun, challenging him to pick up arms and fight for righteousness. The heft of Krishna thus becomes so very onerous for any one human form to carry as a role model. Resultantly, he spends his life in the little fragments of his teachings to promote his cause.

    Post the battles of Lanka and Mahabharat you had those iconic—blazing writers and poets like Valmiki, Tulsidas and Ved Vyas capturing the vivid description of the proceedings that led to the deadly wars. Together with awesome description of the scenes of war that remain unparalleled even today.

    And going forward when it comes to Vanaprastha and Sanyas we have Varanasi to teach us how to approach retirement and death as a role model. People come to Varanasi to see live Hinduism and even to die. The pyre is ever lit in Manikarnika Ghat and they say if a person is cremated there he or she goes to heaven directly.

    It is one of the oldest ghats of Varanasi. It is revered in Hindu mythology that when Mata Sati, Lord Shiva’s wife sacrificed her life and set her body ablaze after Raja Daksh Prajapati, her father and one of the sons of Lord Brahma tried to humiliate her husband Shiva in the Yagya. Lord Shiva took her burning body to Himalaya. On seeing the unending sorrow of Lord Shiva, Vishnu sent his divine Sudershan Chakra to cut the body into 51 parts which fell on earth. Lord Shiva established Shakti Peeth wherever Sati’s body had fallen. At Manikarnika ghat Mata Sati’s ornament had fallen. The lesson therefore is loaded with the despicable arrogance of king Daksh and the pristine relationship of Sati and Shiva—that can’t be emulated as a role model.

    In the treasured mythological scriptures such as Purans and Upanishads, battles between the Devatas (Gods) and Asuras (Demons) have often been described in great detail and on many occasions. Asuras, have always troubled Devatas for some reason or the other. In fact, they were mostly stronger than the Devatas in strength, and therefore Devatas were always scared of them. Even Devraj Indra who was extremely powerful and laced with a lot of divine offence could not harm them in any manner.  Many such wars were even fought, in an around, the present day UP.   Samudra Mathan (Churning of ocean) resulting into Kumbh, has also seen the bitter war between the Devatas and the Asuras for Amrit (Divine Nectar). Where, Lord Vishnu had to intervene. Because, had Asuras drank Amrit they would have become immortal, and that would have meant destruction of the goodness in the world.

    There are innumerable stories and one can go on and on. But the moot point is, whether, the present day generation of the state is living up to the values created by these role models.

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By Kamlesh Tripathi

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                                                      https://kamleshsujata.wordpress.com

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Shravan Charity Mission is an NGO that works for poor children suffering from life threatening diseases. Should you wish to donate for the cause the bank details are given below:

NAME OF ACCOUNT: SHRAVAN CHARITY MISSION

Account no: 680510110004635 (BANK OF INDIA)

IFSC code: BKID0006805

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Our publications

GLOOM BEHIND THE SMILE

ONE TO TANGO … RIA’S ODYSSEY

AADAB LUCKNOW … FOND MEMORIES

REFRACTIONS … FROM THE PRISM OF GOD

(CAN BE BOUGHT FROM ON LINE BOOK STORES OR WRITE TO US FOR COPIES)

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LORD KRISHNA’S RASLEELA SHOULD NOT BE EMULATED

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    Most Gopis (radha and her sakhis) in their previous lives were great female Rishis (Sage). They were extremely proficient in the study of Vedas. When, Sri Krishna was earlier born as Lord Ram in Ayodhya, all the Rishis wanted to have sensual pleasure with him. Lord Ram had then given a vardaan (blessing) that when he is born as Krishna he will fulfill their wishes. Therefore, to have sensual pleasure with Sri Krishna was an old time wish of the Gopis. And for making Sri Krishna their husband they even went up to Devi Katyayani. There are many such examples like this that establish the fact of Sri Krishna’s supremacy. He was certainly not tied down to the systems and procedures of the physical and mortal world. To bless his devotees in various life situations he used to undertake various jobs and roles. But he could do this only because he was the supreme force. Ordinary and common people should only follow the great teachings of Lord Krishna as spoken and written in Bhagwad Gita. They should never imagine or dare to imitate Krishna by doing the raasleela (Dance of divine love).

    If Sri Krishna could perform raasleela, he could also lift the Goverdhan mount with his little finger. Or he could even kill the ferocious female demon Pootna which was not possible by any ordinary human being. And he had that supreme might to carry out such tasks. Such instances only decorate his personality. In the same manner even raasleela was an uncommon task, that couldn’t have been performed by an ordinary person. Mythology says even Arjun kept doing his duty as advised by Sri Krishna to keep him happy. Doing his duty alone was in his prowess even when Arjun was a great warrior. Krishna desired he should fight his enemies for the sake of mankind which he did to please him. First Arjun was not ready to fight. But later when Krishna exhorted him he changed his mind and decided to fight. Ordinary people only need to follow righteousness and Dharma in the form of karma. They should not abandon their karma at any cost. And by trying to emulate raasleela they are only inviting their own disaster. In the same manner Lord Shiva after Samudra Manthan (churning of the sea) drank the poison that came out of it. This was in the interest of humanity and since then his throat went blue. But if an ordinary person drinks poison to copy Shiva he will surely die.

    So it goes without saying that whatever Sri Krishna did with the Gopis in the raasleela was on account of the age old Vardaan that carried no personal benefit for him.

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Posted by Kamlesh Tripathi

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                                                    https://kamleshsujata.wordpress.com

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Share if you like it

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Shravan Charity Mission is an NGO that works for poor children suffering from life threatening diseases. Should you wish to donate for the cause the bank details are given below:

NAME OF ACCOUNT: SHRAVAN CHARITY MISSION

Account no: 680510110004635 (BANK OF INDIA)

IFSC code: BKID0006805

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Our publications

GLOOM BEHIND THE SMILE

ONE TO TANGO … RIA’S ODYSSEY

AADAB LUCKNOW … FOND MEMORIES

REFRACTIONS … FROM THE PRISM OF GOD

(CAN BE BOUGHT FROM ON LINE BOOK STORES OR WRITE TO US FOR COPIES)

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BEAUTIFUL LINES & INTERESTING THOUGHTS

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Kamlesh Tripathi

 

 

  • Mind without heart, intelligence without conduct, cleverness without goodness are tools, but only for mischief.
  • Behave the way you can always behave—Annonymous.
  • Who is rich? He that is content. Who is that? Nobody—Benjamin Franklin
  • I would not wish any companion in the world but you—Shakespeare.
  • The Rig Veda tells us: “Let noble thoughts come to us from everywhere.”
  • “Nobody can tell what I suffer! But it is always so. Those who do not complain are never pitied.”
    ― Jane AustenPride and Prejudice
  • “The wound is the place where the Light enters you.”
    ― Jalaluddin Rumi
  • “One thing you can’t hide – is when you’re crippled inside.”
    ― John Lennon
  • Justice as Lord Atkin said is “no cloistered virtue”
  • Sometimes words that fail to make their effect at the time are remembered later—Agatha Christie
  • Give your clients the earliest delivery consistent with quality—whatever the inconvenience to us—Arthur Nielson
  • Opportunities present themselves every day. You just have to be alert and ready to act.—MARK OSTROFSKY, US ENTREPRENEUR
  • Sometimes it’s worse to win a fight than to lose—Billie Holiday
  • The best of us must sometimes eat our words—JK Rowling
  • The only thing that will redeem mankind is cooperation—BERTRAND RUSSELL
  • What is a cynic? A man who knows the price of everything and value of nothing—Oscar Wilde
  • Slow down and steady up—annonymous
  • All work and no play/makes Jack a dull boy. To which the cautionary response goes ‘All play and no work/ Makes Jack a mere toy.’ TOI Editorial
  • Don’t talk about yourself; it will be done when you leave—Wilson Mazner, US playwright
  • Never hate your enemies. It affects your judgement- Mario Puzo- Godfather
  • We’ve seen over time that countries that have the best economic growth are those that have good governance- Ramez Naam US writer
  • A conversation is a dialogue, not a monologue, That’s why there are so few good conversations- Truman
  • History does not repeat itself exactly but, as Mark Twain put it, it often rhymes.
  • If you have built castles in the air … now put the foundations under them—Henry David Thoureau
  • Margaret Thatcher’s warning that those standing in the middle of the road get run over.
  • The way to crush the bourgeoisie is to grind them between the millstones of taxation and inflation—Vladmir Lenin.
  • Carlyle- the history of the world is but biography of great men.’ Some so called great men have their hands deep in blood.
  • Boris Pasternak author of Dr Zhivago called silence the best sound on earth’
  • The greatest obstacle to excellence is you! A caddy once told a champion golfer, “There’s a perfect shot waiting out there. All you have to do is to get yourself out of the way.”
  • In short, I will part with anything for you but you- Mary Wortley Montagu, Writer.
  • There are good times and there are bad times, but one must never forget the hard times—Annonymous.
  • When a father gives to his son, both laugh; when a son gives to his father, both cry—William Shakespeare.
  • Kritam Lokham Purushoabhijayte- Man himself builds his own world.
  • The boxer Muhammad Ali refused to wear his seat-belt on a plane. “Superman doesn’t need a belt,” he insisted. Tying his belt for him, the stewardess replied, “Superman doesn’t need a plane either.”
  • Exhibitionists: at a wedding they want to be the bride. At a funeral the corpse. Julius Caesar who was an incorrigible egotist, was kidnapped when he was a child. He was held for a ransom of 11,000 gold pieces. Horrified exhorted his captors to raise the sum to 250,000 gold pieces so as to preserve his prestige.
  • You only find out who is swimming naked when the tide goes out—Warren Buffet
  • The whole of western science has developed from Greek philosophy. It stands on the foundations of Greek Philosophy, and one of Greek philosophy’s basic beliefs is that time travels in a straight line.
  • The bread that falls off your plate nearly always lands on the buttered side.
  • Evil manners live in brass, but our virtues we write in water.
  • There is a Mexican saying that we die three deaths: the first time we die is when our bodies die. The second is when our bodies are lowered into the earth, out of sight. The third time we die is when our loved ones forget us.
  • Being different and thinking different makes a person unforgettable. History does not remember the forgettable.- Suzy Kassem, US writer.

 

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Special significance of number 18 in Hindu scriptures

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    Number 18 unquestionably has a great significance in Hindu scriptures. Apart from the fact that there are 18 Purans, 18 major Up-purans, and 18 Dharm-Shastras. The importance of number 18 is best explained in the great epic of Mahabharat, which is divided into 18 parvas or sections. The great war of Mahabharat was fought with 18 divisions of army. And out of this 11 were on the side of Kauravas and 7 on the side of Pandavas. The war lasted for 18 days. Finally, it is said that only 18 persons survived the war. The treatise Shrimad Bhagwad Gita is a part of Mahabharat and has 18 chapters. In Gita, Lord Krishna describes the ideal man in 18 verses at the end of Chapter 2, in which he lists the 18 traits that constitute the man with a steady wisdom.

    The central theme of all scriptures of all religions in the world are the same: Prime being the victory of the higher being over the lower one, or righteousness over unrighteousness, or of good over the evil, of dharma over adharma. Ved Vyas had originally titled Mahabharat as Jaya (victory). The word Jaya is in the opening stanzas of both Mahabharat and Gita.

    In the KatapayadiSystem (numerical notation system) of Sanskrit numerology, each letter has a formula-based numerical value, where the numerical value of the word Jaya is 18. To stress on the importance of the word Jaya, number 18 is given a prominent place not only in Mahabharat, but also in various other Hindu scriptures. Thus, number 18 is repeatedly used as an auspicious reminder, to be alert in our constant battle, for inner spiritual victory.

(taken from Hindu scriptures)

By Kamlesh Tripathi

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THE TWO MAJOR HISTORICAL EPICS IN HINDUISM-VALMIKI, TULSIDAS AND VED VYAS

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    Had it not been for the ultimate epic writers and sages such as Valmiki and Tulsidas who wrote Ramayan, and Ved Vyas who wrote Mahabharat. Hinduism would have remained incomplete and perhaps in the confines of God alone. It is only because of these great all time writers. The history of Hinduism has spread so comprehensively all across the world since inception.

    Ramayan and Mahabharat are the two historical sagas referred as Itihas (history) in Hinduism. That serves as the eternal inspiration for humanity and is considered as the putative and exemplary realization of the four … purusharthas (efforts): Dharma (righteous and dutiful) Artha (wealth) Kama (desire and fulfillment) and Moksha (liberation).

    Ramayan in the real sense is the ‘abode of Lord Ram’ and is smaller of the two great works. The tireless epic mirrors the highest ideals of Hindu tradition, culture and civilization. The story relates to Treta Yug (one of the four ages of the world) and centers on Ram. The prince of Ayodhya and the incarnation of Lord Vishnu, and his wife Sita as the incarnation of Mother Lakshmi. Ramayan sings the glory of Lord Ram and advises humanity on how to lead a fulfilling life and attain the four purusharthas. The epic is profound and timeless in its popularity. It teaches with the analogy of symbolism. As to how an individual can evolve into greatness and perfection.

    Sage Valmiki’s Ramayana has been translated into most Indian languages, as well as several foreign languages, including Russian. It consists of 24,000 stanzas in seven cantos, and depicts Rama as the ideal king, son, brother, friend, and husband. In Bharat, Lakshman, and Shatrughan, we see exemplified ideal brothers. In Sita, we have the purest flower of Indian womanhood. Who is devoted to her Lord in thought, word, and deed.

    Ramayana is an ideal textbook of morals and values. That inspires nobler dimensions of character and conduct. Other noteworthy and famous versions of Ramayana include Sage Veda Vyasa’s Adhyatma Ramayana, Goswami Tulsidasa’s Shri Ramcharitamanas (Tulsi Ramayana), and Kambar’s Kamba Ramayana.

    Mahabharat on the other hand is an epic. That is more than eight times the size of Homer’s Iliad and Odyssey combined. In philosophical content it is unparalleled to any other literary work in the world. This grand book of knowledge contains more than 100,000 stanzas in 18 chapters and is the work of the renowned Sage Veda Vyasa.

    The underlying theme of Mahabharata is yato dharma tato jayah, “where there is dharma, there is victory.” Indicating the ultimate triumph of good over evil and the establishment of righteousness.

    The story unfolds toward the end of Dvapara Yuga and describes the genealogy and events leading up to, and after, the familial war between the royal cousins.

    The story is used as a vehicle. To convey eternal philosophical truths of the highest order. It is said, “that which is in Mahabharata can be seen elsewhere, but that which is not there cannot be seen anywhere else.” This gives an idea of the comprehensiveness of subjects in the epic. Which is full of lofty instructions on all aspects of human life and endeavour—an inspiring saga of India’s past glory, portraying all that is great and noble in humanity.

    The guiding spirit throughout the epic is the divine figure of Lord Krishna. Who brings the pure and the righteous to Himself, and destroys the evil and the evildoers. Shrimad Bhagwad Gita or the “Lord’s Song” is part of Mahabharata.

 

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Posted by Kamlesh Tripathi

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                                                   https://kamleshsujata.wordpress.com

     *

Share if you like it

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Shravan Charity Mission is an NGO that works for poor children suffering from life threatening diseases. Should you wish to donate for the cause the bank details are given below:

NAME OF ACCOUNT: SHRAVAN CHARITY MISSION

Account no: 680510110004635 (BANK OF INDIA)

IFSC code: BKID0006805

*

Our publications

GLOOM BEHIND THE SMILE

ONE TO TANGO … RIA’S ODYSSEY

AADAB LUCKNOW … FOND MEMORIES

REFRACTIONS … FROM THE PRISM OF GOD

(CAN BE BOUGHT FROM ON LINE BOOK STORES OR WRITE TO US FOR COPIES)

*****

 

 

FOLLOW THE TEACHINGS ONLY, DON’T ATTEMPT TO IMITATE GOD

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By Kamlesh Tripathi

gita picture of gita 2

A tip from Gita

Follow the teachings only, don’t attempt to imitate God- Gita

“Man should attempt to follow the spiritual teachings of God. Either by following the God directly or through his avatars on whom he has vested such powers. His updesh (sermons) alone are good enough for the welfare of mankind, which any intelligent person can explain to us in a proper manner.

It is indeed in the interest of human beings to draw their lessons only from the sermons of God and never try and attempt to either imitate or emulate his actions for that could be hazardous. A devotee of Lord God Shiva shouldn’t attempt to consume poison. Just as he drank all of it that came out from the Samudra Manthan (Churning of the sea).

We should consider God as the supreme power and his avatars the forces that reign and control the direction and speed of the sun and the moon.   Any person without such powers, in his own interest should not try and imitate the all powerful God almighty.

Lord God Shiva consumed all the poison that came out of Samudra manthan, because he had the capacity and ability to do so. But if an ordinary person tries to consume even a drop of poison he will die. Lord Shiva has many ardent devotees and followers who consume ganja (Cannabis) and other intoxicating stuff, thinking they are permitted to follow suit just because Lord God Shiva consumes it. Such devotees and followers are only killing themselves, because their body and soul does not have the capacity to sustain this poison over a long period of time like Lord Shiva.

In the same manner there are many devotees of Lord Krishna who intend to practice and imitate his Rass-Lila or love dance, but forget that he also had the capacity to lift the Goverdhan Parvat which an ordinary person can’t.

Therefore, the best option would be not to imitate the all powerful God and his Avatars and only follow their updesh. Without eligibility and capacity one should not try and copy what God does as it will only hurt. And there are many God’s and Avatars who too don’t have the powers of God Almighty yet they are God’s.

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STORY: KRISHNA JANMASHTAMI

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By Kamlesh Tripathi

janmashtami janmastami 2 janmastami1

Lord Kirshna’s birthday on Krishna Janmashtami is indicative of a path breaking new era. Let’s analyse it from a fresh point of view. He was born in the night. Night signifies darkness and darkness is indicative of ignorance and illiteracy. Krishna’s birth brought the light of dazzling knowledge that removed illiteracy of minds.

He was born in a jail, where his parents were tied to chains. This signifies that we too are in our own jails and are locked up in our own vices such as sex, anger, greediness, selfish love, hatred, jealousy, enmity, cheat, eroticism and arrogance. When, he was born all the chains in the prison broke by themselves, and all the prison guards went off to sleep and he was let off the jail. This shows God almighty has tremendous powers and can make anyone sleep or wake up from sleep. If we with true spirits remember him, all our doubts are removed and what we are left with is love, trust and faith.

Today, the people of this world look at each other with a great amount mistrust and jealousy. Man’s intelligence and skills are misused which gives rise to human discords. Wars are fought to keep peace. In this violent and deceitful atmosphere it is even more important to learn trust, gentleness, hope and love from Lord Krishna.

After his birth little-mighty Krishna was shifted to Gokul (Gau-kul) In Sanskrit ‘Gau’ means a cow, which is the emblem of purity, simplicity and nobility. Baby Krishna—avatar of God was kept away from the atmosphere of slavery and cruelty of king Kans. In fact he was kept in the pure and loving surroundings of mother Yashoda’s home which depicts even we could attract Lord Krishna to come and stay at our home provided we too have earnest love for God and his simple ways.

Srikrishna was born on ashtami—which is the eighth day of the calendar month and falls in—shani-grah that signifies algaav (non-attachment) This conveys the message that when Krishna was born he was away and above the mischief and deceit of the world. This also means we should promote dispassion and surrender from the world and should do away with ‘attachment’ but in any case we should not forget our real self.

Today in many families people don’t respect their elders and love their younger ones. There is a great amount of mistrust. Religious fanaticism is all over. And in such an atmosphere birth of Lord Krishna gives us a feeling of positivity.

And his birth brings us the holy message:

“Learn to have faith in yourself the way I have faith in you. Follow the discipline of life, stay within your own simple behaviour and help me in serving others as it is your duty. Don’t worry about anything. Without any conditions surrender yourself to me with all your love. I will look after your welfare both in this birth and beyond.”

This should be our aim of life.

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