Tag Archives: kauravas

BOOK REVIEW: LEADER by Devdutt Pattanaik

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Khidki (Window)

–Read India Initiative—

This is only an attempt to create interest in reading. We may not get the time to read all the books in our lifetime. But such reviews, talk and synopsis will at least convey what the book is all about.

    Hello and welcome friends. The book for today is ‘LEADER—50 insights from mythology’ by none other than Devdutt Pattanaik. This manuscript has seen the light of the day through renowned publishers HarperCollins. The price of this book is rupees 499. It was published in the year 2017 under management classification.

    Devdutt Pattanaik as we all know since 1996 has written over thirty books and 700 columns, on how stories, symbols, and rituals that construct the subjective truth of myths, of ancient, and modern cultures around the world.

    The book is indeed unique in many senses where, the author has tried to link the happenings and beliefs of mythology with our day-to-day life, especially, management of business enterprises. To write such a book, the author, obviously needed to have, vast cross section insights, into mythology, and its perfect syncretism for the safeguard of mankind. And the author has done exactly that.

    The book totals up to 235 pages. It has 50 chapters, and each chapter has a management lesson that emanates out of, either, a mythological tenet, or a mythological happening. Each chapter is some four to five pages long, written in plain English. Sentences are, quite well structured, with no wastage of words. And it touches everyone’s life, for most of us are actually struggling, in some form or the other, in this formidable orbit of life.

    I may not be in a position to narrate each and every episode or chapter of the book to you. But I would certainly like to take you through certain mythological names, events, episodes and tenets in the book that construct each chapter and then connects it with the relevant modern day episodes of business and the corporate world. The book encircles Mahabharata, Krishna, Arjuna, Vishwaroopa, Panadvas, Krishna, Draupadi, Kauravas, Duryodhana, Yudhistira, Dronacharya, Drupada, Kurukshetra, Bhagvata, Karna, Bhisma-Pitahmah, Bheem, Shikhandi, Elephant, Ashwatthama, Shalya, Bhagavata Purana, Khandavaprastha, Mathura, Kansa, Narada, Dwarka, Sudama, Uttanka, Gandhari, Sukant, Sharda, Kaliya the serpent, Hastinapur and Vyasa. These names itself will give you a flavour of the book.

    The author also connects Mahadeva, Shiva, Parvati, Rama, Ramayana, Rishi Vishwamitra, King Dasharatha, Bharata, Hanuman, Kumbhakarna, Vibhisana, Ayodhya, Ravana, Lanka, Garuda, Kartikeya, Ganesh, Shiv-puran, Daksha Prajapati, Varuna, Vishnu, Deva, Asuras, Lakshmi, Vishnu-Purana, Manu, Upanishads, nymph-Tilottama, Kama and Menka. These names only tell you in which circuit the book is indeed moving.

    The very name Devdutt Pattanaik might instil, in some prospective readers that the book has a Hindu flare. Where, I would like to clarify the book only has a Corporate and business flare backed up by episodic mythology, that is relevant to prove the point. No wonder it has episodes from Bible and Quran and talks of Prophet, Nathan, David, Muhammad, Ramzan, Archangel Gabriel, Mecca, Arabs, Europe, Persia, Christianity and Islam.

    It is refreshing to read about Greek Gods, Olympic Motto —Citius, Altius, Fortius—that translates into faster, higher, stronger. Then you have Ulysses, Hercules, Achilles, Odysseus, Apollo, Sea-God Poseidon, Greek God Hermes, Greek—Sisyphus, Greek heaven of the Elysian Fields, and how the author connects it to modern times.

    The book draws lessons from Brahma, Durga, Kamakhya, Shruti, Rishis, Yagnas, Raja-suya Yagna, Ashrama-dharma, Ashwamedha yagya, Mount Meru and Vishwakarma. It gives due importance to animals such as Boar, Eagle, Lion and horse. It spins a situational, positional and devotional story out of Chandra Gupta Maurya, Chanakya, Vikramaditya & Vetal, Chatrapati Shivaji, Shaunaka—the sage, Vaishampayana and Maa Santoshi Vrat.

    Both mythology and life is incomplete without stars and planets. The author brings around an episode with Brihaspati—Jupiter and Shukra—Venus.

    The author reminds of the greatness of Gautama, Buddha, Agastaya Muni, Nahusha, Indradyuma, Rishi Markandeya, Savitri, Satyavan, Shaktimuni and Harishchandra.

    Indian mythology has always had a lineage of folk tales where the author has included episodes of Akbar-Birbal, Shekchilli, Ganguteli, Raja Bhoj, Gobar ka Ganesh to convey lessons for modern day.

    And last but not the least the author even takes tips from Vivah-marriage, masculine, feminine, Americano—Pavlonian, Alpha-Male, Mughals, Jahapanah, Palki & Palanquin.

    We all think we know a lot about our own religion. But the reality is quite different. You will find it out when you read the book. For example we all think Duryodhana broke a lot of rules in Mahabharat. But did he actually do so? Find out. Read the book. I would give it eight of ten. A must read.

By Kamlesh Tripathi

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https://kamleshsujata.wordpress.com

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Shravan Charity Mission is an NGO that works for poor children suffering from life threatening diseases especially cancer. Our posts are meant for our readers that includes both children and adults and it has a huge variety in terms of content. We also accept donations for our mission. Should you wish to donate for the cause. The bank details are given below:

NAME OF ACCOUNT: SHRAVAN CHARITY MISSION

Account no: 680510110004635 (BANK OF INDIA)

IFSC code: BKID0006805

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Our publications

GLOOM BEHIND THE SMILE

(The book is about a young cancer patient. Now archived in 7 prestigious libraries of the US, including, Harvard University and Library of Congress. It can also be accessed in MIT through Worldcat.org. Besides, it is also available for reading in Libraries and archives of Canada and Cancer Aid and Research Foundation Mumbai)  

ONE TO TANGO … RIA’S ODYSSEY

(Is a book on ‘singlehood’ about a Delhi girl now archived in Connemara Library, Chennai and Delhi Public Library, GOI, Ministry of Culture, Delhi)

AADAB LUCKNOW … FOND MEMORIES

(Is a fiction written around the great city of Nawabs—Lucknow. It describes Lucknow in great detail and also talks about its Hindu-Muslim amity. That happens to be its undying characteristic. The book was launched in Lucknow International Literary Festival of 2014)

REFRACTIONS … FROM THE PRISM OF GOD

(Co-published by Cankids–Kidscan, a pan India NGO and Shravan Charity Mission, that works for Child cancer in India. The book is endorsed by Ms Preetha Reddy, MD Apollo Hospitals Group. It was launched in Lucknow International Literary Festival 2016)

TYPICAL TALE OF AN INDIAN SALESMAN

(Is a story of an Indian salesman who is, humbly qualified. Yet he fights his ways through unceasing uncertainties to reach the top. A good read not only for salesmen. The book was launched on 10th February, 2018 in Gorakhpur Lit-Fest. Now available in Amazon, Flipkart and Onlinegatha)

RHYTHM … in poems

(Published in January 2019. The book contains 50 poems. The poems describe our day to day life. The book is available in Amazon, Flipkart and Onlinegatha)

(ALL THE ABOVE TITLES ARE AVAILABLE FOR SALE IN AMAZON, FLIPKART AND OTHER ONLINE STORES OR YOU COULD EVEN WRITE TO US FOR A COPY)

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THE STORY OF UTANGA & LORD KRISHNA … from Mahabharat

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    Once when the great battle of Kurukshetra was over, Lord Krishna bade farewell to the Pandavas and left for Dwarka. On his way he met his old Brahmin friend Utanga. Krishna stopped and alighted from his stupendous chariot and wished the Brahmin. Utanga, delighted at the sight of mighty Krishna, returned his greetings and proceeded to make the usual enquiries about the health and welfare of his relatives.

       He enquired if Krishna’s cousins Pandavas and Kauravas loved one another as brothers, and whether they all were flourishing well enough. The innocent Brahmin had not heard about the great battle of Mahabharat that had already been fought.     Lord Krishna was astounded by this question of his and for a moment he stood silent not knowing what to say in reply.

    He then softly narrated what all had happened. How a great battle had been fought where almost all the Kauravas had been exterminated. Upon hearing the story Utanga got very angry. He retorted at Krishna telling him forcefully that He had failed in His duties and warned Him to be prepared to receive his curse. In reply the Lord just smiled and asked him not to use up the fruits of his hard earned penances.

    He then proceeded to show Utanga his Visvarupa primarily to explain to him the message of Bhagavad Gita just as He had done for Arjuna. After this explanation of Krishna, Utanga recovered his calm and with that the Lord was at ease. He told the Brahmin to ask for any boon that he desired. Utanga said, that after having witnessed You—Lord Krishna in your Universal form there isn’t anything left in this world to be desired.

    But when Krishna insisted, Utanga relented by saying that he should be able to find water whenever he felt thirsty in his long journeys. The Lord thus blessed him and went on His way.

    Later when Utanga was passing through a desert he felt very thirsty and remembered the boon he had received from Lord Krishna. He decided to make use of it. The very moment, a nishad (Shudra) appeared before him attired in rags. He had five hunting hounds (dogs) in leash and an animal skin water bag strapped to his shoulder. He offered the bamboo spout of his water bag to the Brahmin to drink from.

    Utanga stared at the man in disgust and told him he was not thirsty and asked him to go. Having said this, he re-approached the Lord in his mind for the boon that He had granted him. The outcaste, meanwhile pressed upon the fastidious Brahmin Utanga, over and over again, to quench his thirst, but it only made Utanga more and more angry, and he refused to drink the water. Finally, the outcaste disappeared.

    Observing the strange disappearance of the Nishad the brahmin reflected, who was he? He could not have been a real Nishad. It was certainly my test where I blundered miserably. I rejected the holy water offered by the outcaste and proved myself to be an arrogant fool. Utanga was now in great anguish when a moment later Krishna Himself appeared before him with his conch shell and discus—Sudershan chakra.

    O Purushottama! Exclaimed Utanga, was it right of You to have sent an outcaste, to offer unclean water to a Brahmin like me? Was this a kind gesture on your part? Asked Utanga in a bitter tone.

    Lord replied smiling, Hey Utanga! It was only for your sake I had asked Indra to take ‘Amrita’ and give it to you as water. He said he would on no account give nectar to a mortal. But I prevailed upon him and he agreed to do so only if I allowed him to test you in the form of a chandal. I accepted the challenge believing you had attained that stage of understanding and wisdom. But you have made me suffer defeat at the hands of Indra. This story is from Mahabharat.

    Moral of the story: Although, the Brahmin asked the Lord only for water, Lord gave him nectar, out of His causeless mercy. The Lord always cares for us more than we do for ourselves. And we just need to have the vision to understand His mercy.

By Kamlesh Tripathi

*

https://kamleshsujata.wordpress.com

*

Share it if you like it

*

Shravan Charity Mission is an NGO that works for poor children suffering from life threatening diseases especially cancer. Our posts are meant for our readers that includes both children and adults and it has a huge variety in terms of content. We also accept donations for our mission. Should you wish to donate for the cause. The bank details are given below:

NAME OF ACCOUNT: SHRAVAN CHARITY MISSION

Account no: 680510110004635 (BANK OF INDIA)

IFSC code: BKID0006805

*

Our publications

GLOOM BEHIND THE SMILE

(The book is about a young cancer patient. Now archived in 7 prestigious libraries of the US, including, Harvard University and Library of Congress. It can also be accessed in MIT through Worldcat.org. Besides, it is also available for reading in Libraries and archives of Canada and Cancer Aid and Research Foundation Mumbai)  

ONE TO TANGO … RIA’S ODYSSEY

(Is a book on ‘singlehood’ about a Delhi girl now archived in Connemara Library, Chennai and Delhi Public Library, GOI, Ministry of Culture, Delhi)

AADAB LUCKNOW … FOND MEMORIES

(Is a fiction written around the great city of Nawabs—Lucknow. It describes Lucknow in great detail and also talks about its Hindu-Muslim amity. That happens to be its undying characteristic. The book was launched in Lucknow International Literary Festival of 2014)

REFRACTIONS … FROM THE PRISM OF GOD

(Co-published by Cankids–Kidscan, a pan India NGO and Shravan Charity Mission, that works for Child cancer in India. The book is endorsed by Ms Preetha Reddy, MD Apollo Hospitals Group. It was launched in Lucknow International Literary Festival 2016)

TYPICAL TALE OF AN INDIAN SALESMAN

(Is a story of an Indian salesman who is, humbly qualified. Yet he fights his ways through unceasing uncertainties to reach the top. A good read not only for salesmen. The book was launched on 10th February, 2018 in Gorakhpur Lit-Fest. Now available in Amazon, Flipkart and Onlinegatha)

RHYTHM … in poems

(Published in January 2019. The book contains 50 poems. The poems describe our day to day life. The book is available in Amazon, Flipkart and Onlinegatha)

(ALL THE ABOVE TITLES ARE AVAILABLE FOR SALE IN AMAZON, FLIPKART AND OTHER ONLINE STORES OR YOU COULD EVEN WRITE TO US FOR A COPY)

*****

 

 

 

MAHABHARAT-DRAUPADI’S PARDON

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    The holy war of Mahabharat had just about ended in which Pandavas had had a thumping victory. But in spite of all this there was a frightening and lasting lament in Pandava’s camp. But no one knew exactly why. When suddenly, Draupadi’s make shift tenement was filled with shrills and bloody echoes of wail. Pandavas ran towards the chamber of Panchali from where these hell cries were coming.  

    The scene was truly gruesome. As there lay, the dead and severed heads of all the five sons of Draupadi in a pool of blood. That was even smeared on their torso. Dharmraj Yudhistir couldn’t bear the scene when he whimpered, ‘Draupadi … its heart rendering.’ And beyond that he couldn’t utter a word. Perhaps, with these few words, his unqualified agony together with surprise and inquisition, all came alive in one go.

    Upon witnessing the gory scene, Gandeevdhari Arjun’s shoulders started twitching. He couldn’t control himself, when he yelled in anger—‘except for that morbid devil Ashwaththama. Who else could have carried out this ghastly crime? Wipe your tears Devi. As I enter into a pratigya, that I will make this rogue prostrate at your feet. I will squash him with my legs, so that you can bathe with his blood.’ Arjun then requested Krishna to be his charioteer. He then wore his armour and lifted his Gandeev and charged after Ashwaththama. Clean-handed Pandavas were now listless, at the brutal murder of their sons. They were now getting wild and ferocious and wanted revenge forthwith. Under the circumstances, scared Ashwaththama couldn’t have remained out of their clutches for long.

    After arresting Ashwaththama. Arjun was beginning to get restless. He asked, ‘Madhusudhan, what should we do with this rogue? How should we punish him?’ And, before, he could even complete his sentence, Lord Krishna in an angry tone reacted—‘Parth! The rascal Brahmin’s execution, alone, is the way out. This was your vow too. So, where is the question of any permission in this matter?’

    But while grieving on her dead sons, when, Draupadi saw Guruputra Ashwaththama tied in ropes and lying in the courtyard. She stood up and started pleading for mercy with Arjun—‘Prannath! Please forgive him.’

    But Arjun remained adamant. He said, ‘Draupadi sit on his chest—I want you to bathe with his blood.’

   But Draupadi kept beseeching in her gruff timbre. She folded her hands to namaskar Ashwaththama, and then addressed Arjun—‘Aryaputra! Ashwaththama happens to be the son of the same hallowed person from whom you have learnt superior war skills. He is also a Brahmin and therefore respectable to Chatriyas. His mother Kripi is even alive today. So, for the sake of her motherhood, where, she sees her son Ashwaththama as her only motive in life to live and doesn’t follow her husband anymore, you must pardon him. And Nath! Also, my sons won’t return to life even if Ashwaththama is sent to the gallows. The way I’m weeping for them. His mother too will weep for him, and God only knows what else she might do. In case I can’t give happiness to someone why should I be the reason for his sorrow?’

    Arjun, along with all his brothers was watching this amazing scene of morality being spelt out by Draupadi. Standing on the side was Bakenbihari in his usual manner, in a calm posture. When he slowly came forward and sarcastically said—‘what happened Arjun, why have you stopped? Come, lift the sword.’

    Arjun bowed at Lord Krishna and said—‘Madhav please pull me out of this dharmsankat’

    Srikrishna as if testing Arjun’s patience said—‘I am once again repeating my orthodoxical tenet to you. And, mind you. I am repeating it for your benefit alone parth!—Not to kill a fallen Brahmin, but to kill a miscreant—this alone is the ultimate dharma.’

    Arjun was spellbound for a moment. But he was a celebrator of wisdom and knowledge. And for him, as if the golden, primordial hint was enough. When he acted forthwith. By pulling out the mani embedded in Ashwaththama’s forehead and thereafter tonsuring him. He then left him to wander as an insulted Brahmin who is anyway like a dead person.

Thus without killing the Brahmin, Arjun gave Ashwaththama punishment equivalent to death and fulfilled his pratigya.

Glossary

Panchali – another name of Draupadi

Gandeevdhari- the bearer of bow—Arjun

Devi – Divine Draupadi

Gandeev – Bow

Pratigya- Vow

Madhav/Bakenbihari/Madhusudhan–  Another name of Lord Krishna

Parth- One who doesn’t miss his target. Name given to Arjun by Lord Krishna

Prannath- Lord of life

Namaskar- Hindu greetings.

Aryaputra – Noble prince.

Nath- Lord.

Dharm sankat- moral ambiguity

Mani-jewel

 

Extracted from Srimad bhagwat puran.

 

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Posted by Kamlesh Tripathi

*

https://kamleshsujata.wordpress.com

*

Share if you like it

*

Shravan Charity Mission is an NGO that works for poor children suffering from life threatening diseases. Should you wish to donate for the cause the bank details are given below:

NAME OF ACCOUNT: SHRAVAN CHARITY MISSION

Account no: 680510110004635 (BANK OF INDIA)

IFSC code: BKID0006805

*

Our publications

GLOOM BEHIND THE SMILE

ONE TO TANGO … RIA’S ODYSSEY

AADAB LUCKNOW … FOND MEMORIES

REFRACTIONS … FROM THE PRISM OF GOD

(CAN BE BOUGHT FROM ON LINE BOOK STORES OR WRITE TO US FOR COPIES)

*****

 

 

 

Special significance of number 18 in Hindu scriptures

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    Number 18 unquestionably has a great significance in Hindu scriptures. Apart from the fact that there are 18 Purans, 18 major Up-purans, and 18 Dharm-Shastras. The importance of number 18 is best explained in the great epic of Mahabharat, which is divided into 18 parvas or sections. The great war of Mahabharat was fought with 18 divisions of army. And out of this 11 were on the side of Kauravas and 7 on the side of Pandavas. The war lasted for 18 days. Finally, it is said that only 18 persons survived the war. The treatise Shrimad Bhagwad Gita is a part of Mahabharat and has 18 chapters. In Gita, Lord Krishna describes the ideal man in 18 verses at the end of Chapter 2, in which he lists the 18 traits that constitute the man with a steady wisdom.

    The central theme of all scriptures of all religions in the world are the same: Prime being the victory of the higher being over the lower one, or righteousness over unrighteousness, or of good over the evil, of dharma over adharma. Ved Vyas had originally titled Mahabharat as Jaya (victory). The word Jaya is in the opening stanzas of both Mahabharat and Gita.

    In the KatapayadiSystem (numerical notation system) of Sanskrit numerology, each letter has a formula-based numerical value, where the numerical value of the word Jaya is 18. To stress on the importance of the word Jaya, number 18 is given a prominent place not only in Mahabharat, but also in various other Hindu scriptures. Thus, number 18 is repeatedly used as an auspicious reminder, to be alert in our constant battle, for inner spiritual victory.

(taken from Hindu scriptures)

By Kamlesh Tripathi

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