Tag Archives: pandavas

INTERESTING FACTS FIGURES AND QUOTES-36

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India carries out a census, of its tiger population, at intervals of four years. The result of the most recent one, released in July 19 shows the tiger population has increased by one-third over the last five years. And that indeed is good news.

Project tiger, is now known as National Tiger Conservation Authority (NTCA).

Lok Sabha recently passed the Dam Safety Bill, 2019, which provides an institutional mechanism for inspection and maintenance, to avert dam breaches.

Discipline is the soul of an army. It makes small numbers formidable— GEORGE WASHINGTON.

It’s welcome that the first batch of army reforms is slated to kick off any day, entailing the relocating of 229 officers to operational posts from the army’s headquarters in Delhi. In any case, the army is too top heavy with a shortage of officers in fighting ranks of Lt-Colonels and below. Overall the army needs to shed around 1.5 lakh personnel over the next six to seven years. That’ll save around Rs 7,000 crore annually.

China has slashed its army strength by three lakh troops. Plus it has a head start in integration with the PLA (Peoples Liberation Army), and then they have PLA strategic support force, PLA rocket force, PLA navy and PLA air force much better integrated under Beijing’s central military commission.

 Danube is Europe’s second longest river, after the Volga. It is located in Central and Eastern Europe. The Danube was once a long-standing frontier of the Roman Empire, and today flows through 10 countries, more than any other river in the world.

Many call Indians in America the model minority. Their success is most visible in technology, where Indians have ascended to the top of the biggest firms and have founded an estimated 10-20% of Silicon Valley start-ups.

 The term Laffer Curve in economics illustrates a theoretical relationship between rates of taxation and the resulting levels of government revenue. It illustrates the concept of taxable income elasticity—i.e., taxable income changes in response to changes in the rate of taxation.

Cutting off the nose to spite the face” is an expression to describe a needlessly self-destructive over-reaction to a problem: “Don’t cut off your nose to spite your face” is a warning against acting out of pique, or against pursuing revenge in a way that would damage oneself more than the object of one’s anger.

The third verse of the Book of Genesis in the King James Bible says I quote, “And God said, Let there be light: and there was light.” Similarly when a Hindu God is pleased with a bhakt and wants to favour him, he just has to say “Tathastu” and the bhakt is blessed.

It was in the year 49 BC when a general in northeast Italy, Gaius Julius, took the momentous decision to cross a shallow river called Rubicon to march into the city of Rome. Roman law forbade entering the city of Rome with armies. Julius’s action led to a civil war and eventual conquest of the empire by him. He became Julius Caesar. Through this action he gave birth to the metaphor ‘crossing the Rubicon.’

“Life is like riding a bicycle. To keep your balance, you must keep moving.” This famous quote is by Albert Einstein.

A UN report highlights how the population in India living in multi-dimensional poverty has almost halved itself from 55.1% to 27.9% between 2005-2006 and 2015-16, uplifting as many as 271 million people.

Mark Twain once said: Kindness is the language which the deaf can hear, and blind can see.

 Lao Tzu wrote: Kindness in words, creates confidence. Kindness in thinking, creates profoundness. Kindness in giving, creates Love.”

When Nakul asked Bhishma, the grand patriarch of the Mahabharata, the night before Kurukshetra war, as to what was the actual reason for this inevitable confrontation between Kauravas and Pandavas, Bhishma told him in one line, ‘Paarsparyam avnati vedanti’—In English it would mean, ‘The decline of reciprocity between the two.’ When reciprocity suffers or dwindles, misunderstanding raises its ugly head and things go haywire.

 Life is short, but there is always time enough for courtesy—said Ralph Waldo Emerson.

Are you aware of the situation where the army’s Eastern Command works from Kolkata, the navy’s from Vishakapatnam and air force from Shillong. Perhaps, the chief of staff is required to streamline operations.

Numerous studies show that forests have been best preserved where tribal communities reside.

Your best ideas, those eureka  moments that turn the world upside down, seldom come when you’re juggling emails, rushing to meet deadlines or in a high-stress meeting. They come when you’re walking the dog, soaking in the bath or swinging in a hammock—says best selling author CARL HONORE

The government bowls many loose balls, but can the opposition score off them?

The Dingo Fence in south-east Australia, is the longest fence in the world having a length of 5,614 km (3,488 mi). The construction of which was finished in 1885.

If foreigners cannot sell their goods to us, they will not have the revenues to pay for the goods they buy from us.

A research group that conducted a survey across 24 countries found 47% of the respondents believed in the existence of an intelligent alien civilisation, of which 60% said we should try to communicate with these aliens. The survey found 68% believers of alien life to be in Russia, and 24% Dutch and balance elsewhere.

By Kamlesh Tripathi

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https://kamleshsujata.wordpress.com

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Shravan Charity Mission is an NGO that works for poor children suffering from life threatening diseases especially cancer. Our posts are meant for our readers that includes both children and adults and it has a huge variety in terms of content. We also accept donations for our mission. Should you wish to donate for the cause. The bank details are given below:

NAME OF ACCOUNT: SHRAVAN CHARITY MISSION

Account no: 680510110004635 (BANK OF INDIA)

IFSC code: BKID0006805

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Our publications

GLOOM BEHIND THE SMILE

(The book is about a young cancer patient. Now archived in 7 prestigious libraries of the US, including, Harvard University and Library of Congress. It can also be accessed in MIT through Worldcat.org. Besides, it is also available for reading in Libraries and archives of Canada and Cancer Aid and Research Foundation Mumbai)  

ONE TO TANGO … RIA’S ODYSSEY

(Is a book on ‘singlehood’ about a Delhi girl now archived in Connemara Library, Chennai and Delhi Public Library, GOI, Ministry of Culture, Delhi)

AADAB LUCKNOW … FOND MEMORIES

(Is a fiction written around the great city of Nawabs—Lucknow. It describes Lucknow in great detail and also talks about its Hindu-Muslim amity. That happens to be its undying characteristic. The book was launched in Lucknow International Literary Festival of 2014)

REFRACTIONS … FROM THE PRISM OF GOD

(Co-published by Cankids–Kidscan, a pan India NGO and Shravan Charity Mission, that works for Child cancer in India. The book is endorsed by Ms Preetha Reddy, MD Apollo Hospitals Group. It was launched in Lucknow International Literary Festival 2016)

TYPICAL TALE OF AN INDIAN SALESMAN

(Is a story of an Indian salesman who is, humbly qualified. Yet he fights his ways through unceasing uncertainties to reach the top. A good read not only for salesmen. The book was launched on 10th February, 2018 in Gorakhpur Lit-Fest. Now available in Amazon, Flipkart and Onlinegatha)

RHYTHM … in poems

(Published in January 2019. The book contains 50 poems. The poems describe our day to day life. The book is available in Amazon, Flipkart and Onlinegatha)

(ALL THE ABOVE TITLES ARE AVAILABLE FOR SALE IN AMAZON, FLIPKART AND OTHER ONLINE STORES OR YOU COULD EVEN WRITE TO US FOR A COPY)

*****

 

 

 

THE STORY OF UTANGA & LORD KRISHNA … from Mahabharat

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    Once when the great battle of Kurukshetra was over, Lord Krishna bade farewell to the Pandavas and left for Dwarka. On his way he met his old Brahmin friend Utanga. Krishna stopped and alighted from his stupendous chariot and wished the Brahmin. Utanga, delighted at the sight of mighty Krishna, returned his greetings and proceeded to make the usual enquiries about the health and welfare of his relatives.

       He enquired if Krishna’s cousins Pandavas and Kauravas loved one another as brothers, and whether they all were flourishing well enough. The innocent Brahmin had not heard about the great battle of Mahabharat that had already been fought.     Lord Krishna was astounded by this question of his and for a moment he stood silent not knowing what to say in reply.

    He then softly narrated what all had happened. How a great battle had been fought where almost all the Kauravas had been exterminated. Upon hearing the story Utanga got very angry. He retorted at Krishna telling him forcefully that He had failed in His duties and warned Him to be prepared to receive his curse. In reply the Lord just smiled and asked him not to use up the fruits of his hard earned penances.

    He then proceeded to show Utanga his Visvarupa primarily to explain to him the message of Bhagavad Gita just as He had done for Arjuna. After this explanation of Krishna, Utanga recovered his calm and with that the Lord was at ease. He told the Brahmin to ask for any boon that he desired. Utanga said, that after having witnessed You—Lord Krishna in your Universal form there isn’t anything left in this world to be desired.

    But when Krishna insisted, Utanga relented by saying that he should be able to find water whenever he felt thirsty in his long journeys. The Lord thus blessed him and went on His way.

    Later when Utanga was passing through a desert he felt very thirsty and remembered the boon he had received from Lord Krishna. He decided to make use of it. The very moment, a nishad (Shudra) appeared before him attired in rags. He had five hunting hounds (dogs) in leash and an animal skin water bag strapped to his shoulder. He offered the bamboo spout of his water bag to the Brahmin to drink from.

    Utanga stared at the man in disgust and told him he was not thirsty and asked him to go. Having said this, he re-approached the Lord in his mind for the boon that He had granted him. The outcaste, meanwhile pressed upon the fastidious Brahmin Utanga, over and over again, to quench his thirst, but it only made Utanga more and more angry, and he refused to drink the water. Finally, the outcaste disappeared.

    Observing the strange disappearance of the Nishad the brahmin reflected, who was he? He could not have been a real Nishad. It was certainly my test where I blundered miserably. I rejected the holy water offered by the outcaste and proved myself to be an arrogant fool. Utanga was now in great anguish when a moment later Krishna Himself appeared before him with his conch shell and discus—Sudershan chakra.

    O Purushottama! Exclaimed Utanga, was it right of You to have sent an outcaste, to offer unclean water to a Brahmin like me? Was this a kind gesture on your part? Asked Utanga in a bitter tone.

    Lord replied smiling, Hey Utanga! It was only for your sake I had asked Indra to take ‘Amrita’ and give it to you as water. He said he would on no account give nectar to a mortal. But I prevailed upon him and he agreed to do so only if I allowed him to test you in the form of a chandal. I accepted the challenge believing you had attained that stage of understanding and wisdom. But you have made me suffer defeat at the hands of Indra. This story is from Mahabharat.

    Moral of the story: Although, the Brahmin asked the Lord only for water, Lord gave him nectar, out of His causeless mercy. The Lord always cares for us more than we do for ourselves. And we just need to have the vision to understand His mercy.

By Kamlesh Tripathi

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https://kamleshsujata.wordpress.com

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Share it if you like it

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Shravan Charity Mission is an NGO that works for poor children suffering from life threatening diseases especially cancer. Our posts are meant for our readers that includes both children and adults and it has a huge variety in terms of content. We also accept donations for our mission. Should you wish to donate for the cause. The bank details are given below:

NAME OF ACCOUNT: SHRAVAN CHARITY MISSION

Account no: 680510110004635 (BANK OF INDIA)

IFSC code: BKID0006805

*

Our publications

GLOOM BEHIND THE SMILE

(The book is about a young cancer patient. Now archived in 7 prestigious libraries of the US, including, Harvard University and Library of Congress. It can also be accessed in MIT through Worldcat.org. Besides, it is also available for reading in Libraries and archives of Canada and Cancer Aid and Research Foundation Mumbai)  

ONE TO TANGO … RIA’S ODYSSEY

(Is a book on ‘singlehood’ about a Delhi girl now archived in Connemara Library, Chennai and Delhi Public Library, GOI, Ministry of Culture, Delhi)

AADAB LUCKNOW … FOND MEMORIES

(Is a fiction written around the great city of Nawabs—Lucknow. It describes Lucknow in great detail and also talks about its Hindu-Muslim amity. That happens to be its undying characteristic. The book was launched in Lucknow International Literary Festival of 2014)

REFRACTIONS … FROM THE PRISM OF GOD

(Co-published by Cankids–Kidscan, a pan India NGO and Shravan Charity Mission, that works for Child cancer in India. The book is endorsed by Ms Preetha Reddy, MD Apollo Hospitals Group. It was launched in Lucknow International Literary Festival 2016)

TYPICAL TALE OF AN INDIAN SALESMAN

(Is a story of an Indian salesman who is, humbly qualified. Yet he fights his ways through unceasing uncertainties to reach the top. A good read not only for salesmen. The book was launched on 10th February, 2018 in Gorakhpur Lit-Fest. Now available in Amazon, Flipkart and Onlinegatha)

RHYTHM … in poems

(Published in January 2019. The book contains 50 poems. The poems describe our day to day life. The book is available in Amazon, Flipkart and Onlinegatha)

(ALL THE ABOVE TITLES ARE AVAILABLE FOR SALE IN AMAZON, FLIPKART AND OTHER ONLINE STORES OR YOU COULD EVEN WRITE TO US FOR A COPY)

*****

 

 

 

MAHABHARAT-DRAUPADI’S PARDON

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    The holy war of Mahabharat had just about ended in which Pandavas had had a thumping victory. But in spite of all this there was a frightening and lasting lament in Pandava’s camp. But no one knew exactly why. When suddenly, Draupadi’s make shift tenement was filled with shrills and bloody echoes of wail. Pandavas ran towards the chamber of Panchali from where these hell cries were coming.  

    The scene was truly gruesome. As there lay, the dead and severed heads of all the five sons of Draupadi in a pool of blood. That was even smeared on their torso. Dharmraj Yudhistir couldn’t bear the scene when he whimpered, ‘Draupadi … its heart rendering.’ And beyond that he couldn’t utter a word. Perhaps, with these few words, his unqualified agony together with surprise and inquisition, all came alive in one go.

    Upon witnessing the gory scene, Gandeevdhari Arjun’s shoulders started twitching. He couldn’t control himself, when he yelled in anger—‘except for that morbid devil Ashwaththama. Who else could have carried out this ghastly crime? Wipe your tears Devi. As I enter into a pratigya, that I will make this rogue prostrate at your feet. I will squash him with my legs, so that you can bathe with his blood.’ Arjun then requested Krishna to be his charioteer. He then wore his armour and lifted his Gandeev and charged after Ashwaththama. Clean-handed Pandavas were now listless, at the brutal murder of their sons. They were now getting wild and ferocious and wanted revenge forthwith. Under the circumstances, scared Ashwaththama couldn’t have remained out of their clutches for long.

    After arresting Ashwaththama. Arjun was beginning to get restless. He asked, ‘Madhusudhan, what should we do with this rogue? How should we punish him?’ And, before, he could even complete his sentence, Lord Krishna in an angry tone reacted—‘Parth! The rascal Brahmin’s execution, alone, is the way out. This was your vow too. So, where is the question of any permission in this matter?’

    But while grieving on her dead sons, when, Draupadi saw Guruputra Ashwaththama tied in ropes and lying in the courtyard. She stood up and started pleading for mercy with Arjun—‘Prannath! Please forgive him.’

    But Arjun remained adamant. He said, ‘Draupadi sit on his chest—I want you to bathe with his blood.’

   But Draupadi kept beseeching in her gruff timbre. She folded her hands to namaskar Ashwaththama, and then addressed Arjun—‘Aryaputra! Ashwaththama happens to be the son of the same hallowed person from whom you have learnt superior war skills. He is also a Brahmin and therefore respectable to Chatriyas. His mother Kripi is even alive today. So, for the sake of her motherhood, where, she sees her son Ashwaththama as her only motive in life to live and doesn’t follow her husband anymore, you must pardon him. And Nath! Also, my sons won’t return to life even if Ashwaththama is sent to the gallows. The way I’m weeping for them. His mother too will weep for him, and God only knows what else she might do. In case I can’t give happiness to someone why should I be the reason for his sorrow?’

    Arjun, along with all his brothers was watching this amazing scene of morality being spelt out by Draupadi. Standing on the side was Bakenbihari in his usual manner, in a calm posture. When he slowly came forward and sarcastically said—‘what happened Arjun, why have you stopped? Come, lift the sword.’

    Arjun bowed at Lord Krishna and said—‘Madhav please pull me out of this dharmsankat’

    Srikrishna as if testing Arjun’s patience said—‘I am once again repeating my orthodoxical tenet to you. And, mind you. I am repeating it for your benefit alone parth!—Not to kill a fallen Brahmin, but to kill a miscreant—this alone is the ultimate dharma.’

    Arjun was spellbound for a moment. But he was a celebrator of wisdom and knowledge. And for him, as if the golden, primordial hint was enough. When he acted forthwith. By pulling out the mani embedded in Ashwaththama’s forehead and thereafter tonsuring him. He then left him to wander as an insulted Brahmin who is anyway like a dead person.

Thus without killing the Brahmin, Arjun gave Ashwaththama punishment equivalent to death and fulfilled his pratigya.

Glossary

Panchali – another name of Draupadi

Gandeevdhari- the bearer of bow—Arjun

Devi – Divine Draupadi

Gandeev – Bow

Pratigya- Vow

Madhav/Bakenbihari/Madhusudhan–  Another name of Lord Krishna

Parth- One who doesn’t miss his target. Name given to Arjun by Lord Krishna

Prannath- Lord of life

Namaskar- Hindu greetings.

Aryaputra – Noble prince.

Nath- Lord.

Dharm sankat- moral ambiguity

Mani-jewel

 

Extracted from Srimad bhagwat puran.

 

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Posted by Kamlesh Tripathi

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https://kamleshsujata.wordpress.com

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Share if you like it

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Shravan Charity Mission is an NGO that works for poor children suffering from life threatening diseases. Should you wish to donate for the cause the bank details are given below:

NAME OF ACCOUNT: SHRAVAN CHARITY MISSION

Account no: 680510110004635 (BANK OF INDIA)

IFSC code: BKID0006805

*

Our publications

GLOOM BEHIND THE SMILE

ONE TO TANGO … RIA’S ODYSSEY

AADAB LUCKNOW … FOND MEMORIES

REFRACTIONS … FROM THE PRISM OF GOD

(CAN BE BOUGHT FROM ON LINE BOOK STORES OR WRITE TO US FOR COPIES)

*****

 

 

 

Special significance of number 18 in Hindu scriptures

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    Number 18 unquestionably has a great significance in Hindu scriptures. Apart from the fact that there are 18 Purans, 18 major Up-purans, and 18 Dharm-Shastras. The importance of number 18 is best explained in the great epic of Mahabharat, which is divided into 18 parvas or sections. The great war of Mahabharat was fought with 18 divisions of army. And out of this 11 were on the side of Kauravas and 7 on the side of Pandavas. The war lasted for 18 days. Finally, it is said that only 18 persons survived the war. The treatise Shrimad Bhagwad Gita is a part of Mahabharat and has 18 chapters. In Gita, Lord Krishna describes the ideal man in 18 verses at the end of Chapter 2, in which he lists the 18 traits that constitute the man with a steady wisdom.

    The central theme of all scriptures of all religions in the world are the same: Prime being the victory of the higher being over the lower one, or righteousness over unrighteousness, or of good over the evil, of dharma over adharma. Ved Vyas had originally titled Mahabharat as Jaya (victory). The word Jaya is in the opening stanzas of both Mahabharat and Gita.

    In the KatapayadiSystem (numerical notation system) of Sanskrit numerology, each letter has a formula-based numerical value, where the numerical value of the word Jaya is 18. To stress on the importance of the word Jaya, number 18 is given a prominent place not only in Mahabharat, but also in various other Hindu scriptures. Thus, number 18 is repeatedly used as an auspicious reminder, to be alert in our constant battle, for inner spiritual victory.

(taken from Hindu scriptures)

By Kamlesh Tripathi

*****

Article-THE FASCINATING TALE OF PARIJAAT TREE

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I LOVE MY INDIA-series

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    In the manner it is believed that Gods and Asuras (demons) claimed ‘Amrit’ by churning the ocean, in the great mythological event of Samundra Manthan,’ which happens to be the genesis of the world famous ‘Kumbh Mela’ now considered the biggest spiritual congregation on earth. In the same manner it is also believed that either Lord Krishna or Arjun brought the Parijaat Tree from heaven.

THE TREE

    Parijaat is a Baobab tree considered sacred. Located in the village of Kintoor, near district Barabanki in Uttar Pradesh. In botanical terms Parijaat is known as Adansonia Digitata and is placed in a special category, because it does not produce either fruits or seeds and neither can its branch cuttings be planted to reproduce a second Parijaat tree. This is a unisex male tree and the botanist say there is no such tree anywhere else to be found. The leaves of the tree in the lower part have five tips like the fingers of a hand, while in the upper parts it has seven.

    Parijat has beautiful small flowers, with snow-white petals, five in number and a red stalk and after drying the flowers take to a golden tinge. The flower blooms only at night and sheds before sunrise, and it also has medicinal value. Parijaat blossoms very occasionally, with very few flowers, but when it does, that is after the season of ‘Ganga Dashehra’ its fragrance spreads far and wide. The age of this tree is said to be some 1000 to 5000 years and the perimeter of the trunk is around 50 feet and the height around 45 feet.

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Mythology

    Kintoor is named after Kunti, mother of Pandavas and is about 38 km east, of district headquarters Barbanki. There also exists a number of ancient temples and their remains around this place. Near the temple established by Kunti, is this special tree called Parijaat which is said to have grown out of Kunti’s ashes.

    There are many other legends about this tree that find popular acceptance. One being, Arjun brought it from heaven and Kunti offered its flowers to Lord Shiva.

    There is also a sad romantic myth. According to which Princess Parijataka was in love with Sun, but her love was never reciprocated. Having lost in love, she committed suicide and from her ashes rose, the Parijaat tree. Since she is unable to bear the sight of her love during the day, she blooms only at night, and sheds the flowers as tears, before the sun rises.

    Another story is, Lord Krishna brought this tree for his beloved queen Satyabhama or Rukmini. According to Harivansh Puraan the Parijaat Tree is a Kalpavriksh or wish bearing tree, which, apart from this one is only found in the heaven. New-weds visit the tree for blessings, and every Tuesday a fair is held where local people worship the tree.

    Some myths go on to say, that the tree sheds its tears on the touch of the first rays of the sun. The fragrant flowers spread their fragrance in the entire area during the day, as a sign of undying love for her lover, the Sun.

    Another myth has a romantic link, but is a bone of contention. According to this myth, the Parijat tree was planted in Indralok (the abode of Lord Indra) which was one of the gifts received from the Samudra Manthan. It was thus a celestial plant, not available on earth. To sow seeds of discord, Narada, brought some flowers from Indralok and gave them to Lord Krishna. And waited to see, to which of his wife Krishna gave the flowers to. Finally Krishna gave the flowers to Rukmini. On seeing this, Narada went to Satyabhama; Krishna’s other wife and told her about it.

    On hearing this Satyabhama’s felt very jealous. Then Narada went on to give her a solution. He suggested that she should insist on Krishna getting the plant itself from Indralok and plant it at her home, instead of a few flowers. Satyabhama decided to do that, and when Krishna came to her quarters, she showed her anger and disappointment on the whole incident and insisted that he get the entire plant from Indralok.

    True to his nature in the mean time Narada went and warned Indra that some earthlings were out to steal the celestial plant from his Indralok. Meanwhile when Krishna and Satyabhama after visiting Indralok were about to leave after picking a branch of the celestial Parijata tree, they were accosted by Indra. Soon a battle broke out between them in which Indra lost.

    But Indra would not let it go so easily. He cursed the plant would never bear fruits again, though it might bear flowers, and thus since then, the Parijat tree does not bear any fruit.

    Having brought the tree to Dwarka, Rukmini also took fancy to the tree, because of its flowers. So Krishna planted the tree in such a manner, that though the tree was planted at Satyabhama’s house, but when it bore flowers, they would fall in Rukmini’s home. Satyabhama had asked for the tree and she got it, and Rukmini wanted the flowers, and she had it too!

    It is believed that the Parijat Tree located at Kintur Village, in Barabanki District of Uttar Pradesh belongs to the age of the Mahabharat. It is mentioned in the Mahabharat that Sri Krishna uprooted the Parijata Tree from the kingdom of Indira, the God of Devas, and presented it to his wife Rukmini.

    Another legend in the Puranas suggests that Arjuna of Mahabarat brought the Parijata Tree for his mother Kunti, who offered it to Shiva.

By Kamlesh Tripathi

 *****

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https://kamleshsujata.wordpress.com

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Share it if you like it

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Shravan Charity Mission is an NGO that works for poor children suffering from life threatening diseases especially cancer. Should you wish to donate for the cause. The bank details are given below:

NAME OF ACCOUNT: SHRAVAN CHARITY MISSION

Account no: 680510110004635 (BANK OF INDIA)

IFSC code: BKID0006805

*

By Kamlesh Tripathi

*

https://kamleshsujata.wordpress.com

*

Share it if you like it

*

Shravan Charity Mission is an NGO that works for poor children suffering from life threatening diseases. Should you wish to donate for the cause the bank details are given below:

NAME OF ACCOUNT: SHRAVAN CHARITY MISSION

Account no: 680510110004635 (BANK OF INDIA)

IFSC code: BKID0006805

*

Our publications

GLOOM BEHIND THE SMILE

(The book is about a young cancer patient. Now archived in 7 prestigious libraries of the US, including, Harvard University and Library of Congress. It can also be accessed in MIT through Worldcat.org. Besides, it is also available for reading in Libraries and archives of Canada and Cancer Aid and Research Foundation Mumbai)  

ONE TO TANGO … RIA’S ODYSSEY

(Is a book on ‘singlehood’ about a Delhi girl now archived in Connemara Library, Chennai and Delhi Public Library, GOI, Ministry of Culture, Delhi)

AADAB LUCKNOW … FOND MEMORIES

(Is a fiction written around the great city of Nawabs—Lucknow. It describes Lucknow in great detail and also talks about its Hindu-Muslim amity. That happens to be its undying characteristic. The book was launched in Lucknow International Literary Festival of 2014)

REFRACTIONS … FROM THE PRISM OF GOD

(Co-published by Cankids–Kidscan, a pan India NGO and Shravan Charity Mission, that works for Child cancer in India. The book is endorsed by Ms Preetha Reddy, MD Apollo Hospitals Group. It was launched in Lucknow International Literary Festival 2016)

TYPICAL TALE OF AN INDIAN SALESMAN

(Is a story of an Indian salesman who is, humbly qualified. Yet he fights his ways through unceasing uncertainties to reach the top. A good read not only for salesmen. The book was launched on 10th February, 2018 in Gorakhpur Lit-Fest. Now available in Amazon, Flipkart and Onlinegatha

(ALL THE ABOVE TITLES ARE AVAILABLE FOR SALE IN AMAZON, FLIPKART AND OTHER ONLINE STORES OR YOU COULD EVEN WRITE TO US FOR A COPY)

*****