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FINANCIAL PLANNING—THE MODERN DAY GOD

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By Kamlesh Tripathi

    We all have heard this famous phrase—Kan kan mein Bhagwan and jako rakhe saiyan maar sake na koi. In the same breath, we should also reflect on, what Lord Krishna had to say in the famous epic Mahabharat—‘I will not do your ‘karma’ for you. You’ll have to that yourself.’ So in essence, all this forms the core ethos and purpose of our lives. No matter what religion you follow and which strata of society you come from. For, the God’s may vary, but the mission of life shall always remain the same. And in all of this—God helps, only those, who help themselves.

    So, in the ultimate analysis we human beings can’t deny the terse reality that we all are born to serve the holy cause. That manifests, while we serve our family and even our society. But in the process we don’t get younger, on the contrary each day, we are only getting older. And, in the drift of life we often plan to give our children good education and values to make them skilled professionals. So that they can, not only compete nationally, but even globally. But that doesn’t come for free. Nor does it come with interspersed dimes here and there. Rather, it comes from some focused and astute FPI (Financial Planning & Insurance). Just, to cite and example. If we require a crore today, to make our child, a doctor. Twenty years hence the coveted amount will be three crores together with inflation, logistics, competition and new technology costs. So, while we often come across quite a few over ambitious parents, boasting aimlessly about the promising career of their children. They hardly do any FPI for it. And, then they say, we love our children. Isn’t that a sham?

    In the same run up most of us think we are immortal. That I will never die. So we don’t ever visualize a situation. Where, we’ll leave home one day, never to return. But in that case, who will run my establishment, feed my children and beyond that who will educate them. The litmus test would be to ascertain, which relative of mine will pay for all this and for how long. And the buck doesn’t stop there. As the clock keeps ticking with each breath—remember we are only getting older. For as long as you can work, the moolah will pour in. But when you stop working, where will your nickel and dimes come from. So, what happens when you retire? These are some crude realities that the pigeon in you keeps avoiding and condoning while the cat of life keeps observing.

    I was recently at a training programme conducted by Maxlife Insurance. Where, I got many such vital answers to the complexities of life. Remember, the pain of effort is much better than the pain of regret. So, plan your life well. Attend such programmes. And don’t just snub any FPI professional, when he calls on you to plan your wayward life. Better would be to take him as the arm of God.

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By Kamlesh Tripathi

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Shravan Charity Mission is an NGO that works for poor children suffering from life threatening diseases. Should you wish to donate for the cause the bank details are given below:

NAME OF ACCOUNT: SHRAVAN CHARITY MISSION

Account no: 680510110004635 (BANK OF INDIA)

IFSC code: BKID0006805

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Our publications

GLOOM BEHIND THE SMILE

ONE TO TANGO … RIA’S ODYSSEY

AADAB LUCKNOW … FOND MEMORIES

REFRACTIONS … FROM THE PRISM OF GOD

(CAN BE BOUGHT FROM ON LINE BOOK STORES OR WRITE TO US FOR COPIES)

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WHAT IS GOOD FOR DEVELOPMENT OF INDIA—POLITICAL STABILITY OR POLITICAL COMPETITION?

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    It is said, competition is good for consumers, but how about competition in politics? Where, I am reminded of what Indira Gandhi had once said,

    ‘My grandfather once told me that there were two kinds of people: those who do the work and those who take the credit. He told me to try to be in the first group; there was much less competition there.’

    She indeed was one of the tallest leaders of the Congress party and even that of India. Who dared to dismember a neighbouring country. Therefore, if we superimpose her quote. On the tenets of Congress Party or for that matter, on any other political party. It will be an interesting churning of inferences.

    Before India attained freedom. There were thirteen political parties. That jointly fought the British Raj for independence, with Congress in the forefront. The focus then was not development, but to attain independence. Where, they competed and colluded in a smart manner and achieved it. Post independence. Some of these parties wound up, as their mission was over. Whereas, some dissolved into each other. Congress, then became the tallest party with practically no opposition. Muslim League, the other powerful party was more or less hived off to Pakistan upon partition. Congress, thereafter, was in power for around fifty six years. But in these years. They could have done much better. Than what they actually did. On the contrary. Post independence. They brought in the ‘License Raj.’ That only stifled the progress and development of the country. Where, only a few in power benefited. So can one say political stability attracts development? No is the answer.

    License Raj was finally dissolved. When P.V. Narasimha Rao took over as the Prime Minister, in 1991, with Dr Manmohan Singh as his Finance Minister in a Congress led Government. Thereon, things started looking up in India. But, by then the coalition politics had also come into play. No single party was ruling the roost. Competition had set in. Where, every political party had to perform on economic parameters too. Apart, from the usual, socialistic ones. And, where, the voter’s aspiration had also increased with the spread of literacy.

  •     If we go through India’s GDP in absolute numbers. We find in 1950-51 it was 2.79 lac crores. That reached 20 lac crores by 1991-92 (15% annual growth for 40 years). But, was that enough? Especially, when we were starting from a very low plank? This grew to 57.41 lac crores by 2013-14 (8.90% annual growth for 21 years). This was when the environment had become more challenging. These growths were also facilitated by growth in population.
  •     When we analyse the annual growth of India’s GDP at factor cost. We find. In 40 years, starting 1951-52 to 1991-92. Thrice, it showed negative growth, and in 79-80, after thirty years of independence, it even went down to -5.2%, which is shameful. In fact growth started steadying above 5% only after 91-92. When economy was set in to liberalize and when competition among political parties had increased and coalition governments had become the order of the day.
  •     In 1950-51 the food grain production was 50.83 million tonnes. In 1991-92 it reached 180 million tonnes. An increase of 129.47 million tonnes (an annual growth rate of 6.36%). This could have been much better. Had the economy been opened in the 70’s, which the Congress government didn’t bother to do. By the year 2013-14 production reached 263.2 million tonnes. An increase of 83.2 million tonnes since 1992 (a 2.20% annual growth rate). That goes to show political competition lost focus on agriculture.
  •     In the infrastructure sector. Construction of roads, (both surfaced and non-surfaced) picked up a steady pace only after 2008-09. After political competition started hotting up in India and the same goes for exports which too picked up post 2003.

    The US is the world’s largest economy. There are two main parties. The Republicans and the Democrats. They follow each other close on heels on various issues. Yet, in the last two decades. Like in the case of many developed nations. Its growth rate has been decreasing. If in the 50’s and 60’s. The average growth rate was above 4 percent. In the 70’s and 80’s it dropped to 3 percent. And in the last ten years. The average rate has been below 2 percent and since the second quarter of 2000. It has never reached the 5 percent level. So, has political stability in American politics helped the growth rate? Or is it. That the inertia of good sound policies of the government, is driving the growth, irrespective of which party rules. Or is it that there is no politics over growth?

    In India we have seven national parties. That include BJP, INC, CPI (Marxist), CPI India, BSP, TMC and the NSP. In addition we also have forty eight state parties. There is enough competition on the ground. But whether it is helping development is the big question. There is no firm paradigm of continuous fast track of development. That only goes to prove that political competition, may not mean development in India.

    So, sadly, India has seen both the extremes. One, when Congress was stable and virtually in a monopoly for 56 years. When, morosely, there was only a skeletal and self complimenting development. Nothing exponential. Which was what, was required. And even now when you have a number of political parties on the ground. The development is dismal and that too at the cost of integrity. That we saw in Congress UPA regime. Somehow, BJP has been able to reverse this trend. Because it is in full majority and politically stable, and its top leadership is averse to corruption. Needless, to say political parties are not competing for development. But for retention of power. This reflects glaringly in Uttar Pradesh.

    Uttar Pradesh is the political hot seat of India. It has BJP, SP, BSP and Congress as main parties on the ground. In the past there were five prime ministers from UP. Apart from Dr Manmohan, who, also, was under the command and control of the first family of Indian politics, supposedly from UP. Yet UP is where it was some forty years back. Despite, being the cradle of civilization, and the cynosure of every era. Today, UP is poor, hungry, unemployed, illiterate and is one of the most prominent members of the Bimaru states of India.

    In six and a half decades of independence. India has grown manifold in population, but sparsely in infrastructure. But some states have grown faster than the others, and that’s where UP has lagged behind. It is still way behind Kerala, Gujarat, Punjab and Haryana.

    So, then what went wrong in UP? Especially, after independence. And where did UP drop the ball? It was one of independent India’s most prosperous states. It kept growing till 1980s. From a steady growth in the beginning of the 1st five year plan in 1951 till the 1980s. UP has also seen frequent change of guard. Therefore, most certainly, it is a victim of political competition.

    AAP came with a lot of hope. That India will witness a different style of governance. But the situation with Delhi Government is atrocious as of now. On the contrary if we take Tamil Nadu. Governance and development is far better, between the two major parties that is the AIDMK and DMK.

    So then what is good for India? Political stability or political competition? There are no straight answers. But I found an appropriate quote that can act as a solution—‘stop competing with others, start competing with yourself.’

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By Kamlesh Tripathi

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https://kamleshsujata.wordpress.com

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Share if you like it

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Shravan Charity Mission is an NGO that works for poor children suffering from life threatening diseases. Should you wish to donate for the cause the bank details are given below:

NAME OF ACCOUNT: SHRAVAN CHARITY MISSION

Account no: 680510110004635 (BANK OF INDIA)

IFSC code: BKID0006805

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Our publications

GLOOM BEHIND THE SMILE

(Archived in 7 prestigious libraries of the US, including, Harvard University and Library of Congress. It can also be accessed in MIT through Worldcat.org. Besides, it is also available for reading in Libraries and archives of Canada and Cancer Aid and Research Foundation Mumbai)

ONE TO TANGO … RIA’S ODYSSEY

(Archived in Connemara Library, Chennai and Delhi Public Library, GOI, Ministry of Culture)

AADAB LUCKNOW … FOND MEMORIES

(Launched in Lucknow International Literary Festival 2014)

REFRACTIONS … FROM THE PRISM OF GOD

(Co-published by Cankids–Kidscan, a pan India NGO and Shravan Charity Mission, that works for Child cancer in India. The book is endorsed by Ms Preetha Reddy, MD Apollo Hospitals Group. Book was launched in Lucknow International Literary Festival 2016)

(CAN BE BOUGHT FROM ON LINE BOOK STORES OR WRITE TO US FOR COPIES)

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DOCTRINE OF KARMA AND REINCARNATION

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    Why do Hindus believe in these two doctrines? One being karma and the other being reincarnation. Because these doctrines not only explain the unusual occurrences logically. They also shed light on day-to-day events of life. Hindus do not consider life and death to be mutually exclusive. But intertwined and inseparable. Like the two sides of the same coin. If there are disparities between two individuals at the time of birth, and if these disparities can be seen. Then the cause for these disparities must have preceded their births.

  • Karma: The word karma means “action.” In accordance with the cosmic laws of karma. Each individual reaps the fruits of his actions, performed in this lifetime or in former lives. This logically explains the disparities in creation, between various individuals, environments and situations. No deed, small or great, good or bad, can be without an effect—this essentially is the law of karma, the law of casualty. In fact one begins to feel as if it is Newton’s 3rd law of motion—‘to every action there is an equal and opposite reaction’ was drawn out of the doctrine of karma.
  • Karma is no fate. Fate implies helplessness in a human being, to determine his own destiny. The law of karma states that the individual is the creator of his own destiny, because his conscious choices in life determines his actions and the fruits thereof.
  • Reincarnation: Hindus believe that the jiva, or the individual being, travels from life to life. Acquiring bodies and environments best suited to exhaust his vasanas (vices) or innate tendencies that are expressed as desires, emotions, and actions. The exhaustion of vasanas allows the jiva to reach his ultimate goal: complete freedom from the cycle of birth and death through the realization of his true nature as the Self, or Brahman.

—synopsis from a book on Hinduism—by Chinmaya Mission Trust—

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By Kamlesh Tripathi

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https://kamleshsujata.wordpress.com

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Share if you like it

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Shravan Charity Mission is an NGO that works for poor children suffering from life threatening diseases. Should you wish to donate for the cause the bank details are given below:

NAME OF ACCOUNT: SHRAVAN CHARITY MISSION

Account no: 680510110004635 (BANK OF INDIA)

IFSC code: BKID0006805

*

Our publications

GLOOM BEHIND THE SMILE

(Archived in 7 prestigious libraries of the US, including, Harvard University and Library of Congress. It can also be accessed in MIT through Worldcat.org. Besides, it is also available for reading in Libraries and archives of Canada and Cancer Aid and Research Foundation Mumbai)  

ONE TO TANGO … RIA’S ODYSSEY

(Archived in Connemara Library, Chennai and Delhi Public Library, GOI, Ministry of Culture)

AADAB LUCKNOW … FOND MEMORIES

(Launched in Lucknow International Literary Festival 2014)

REFRACTIONS … FROM THE PRISM OF GOD

(Co-published by Cankids–Kidscan, a pan India NGO and Shravan Charity Mission, that works for Child cancer in India. The book is endorsed by Ms Preetha Reddy, MD Apollo Hospitals Group. Book was launched in Lucknow International Literary Festival 2016)

(CAN BE BOUGHT FROM ON LINE BOOK STORES OR WRITE TO US FOR COPIES)

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Special significance of number 18 in Hindu scriptures

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    Number 18 unquestionably has a great significance in Hindu scriptures. Apart from the fact that there are 18 Purans, 18 major Up-purans, and 18 Dharm-Shastras. The importance of number 18 is best explained in the great epic of Mahabharat, which is divided into 18 parvas or sections. The great war of Mahabharat was fought with 18 divisions of army. And out of this 11 were on the side of Kauravas and 7 on the side of Pandavas. The war lasted for 18 days. Finally, it is said that only 18 persons survived the war. The treatise Shrimad Bhagwad Gita is a part of Mahabharat and has 18 chapters. In Gita, Lord Krishna describes the ideal man in 18 verses at the end of Chapter 2, in which he lists the 18 traits that constitute the man with a steady wisdom.

    The central theme of all scriptures of all religions in the world are the same: Prime being the victory of the higher being over the lower one, or righteousness over unrighteousness, or of good over the evil, of dharma over adharma. Ved Vyas had originally titled Mahabharat as Jaya (victory). The word Jaya is in the opening stanzas of both Mahabharat and Gita.

    In the KatapayadiSystem (numerical notation system) of Sanskrit numerology, each letter has a formula-based numerical value, where the numerical value of the word Jaya is 18. To stress on the importance of the word Jaya, number 18 is given a prominent place not only in Mahabharat, but also in various other Hindu scriptures. Thus, number 18 is repeatedly used as an auspicious reminder, to be alert in our constant battle, for inner spiritual victory.

(taken from Hindu scriptures)

By Kamlesh Tripathi

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‘MANVANTARA’—THE METHOD OF TIME CALCULATION

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    Hindu calculation of time is based on ‘manvantara.’ Antara means “space” or “duration between.” Manvantara is therefore a period of time or duration, during which a Manu (the archetypal human being) rules the entire creation. Hindus developed the skill of calculating time based on manvantaras. Western scientists and archaeologists later discovered. That these manvantaras are based on accurate astronomical calculations.

    One manvantara is calculated as follows:

  • 360 human years make one divya varshs (celestial year)
  • 4,800 divya varshas make one Satya Yuga, or Krita Yuga.
  • 3,600 divya varshas make one Treta Yuga.
  • 2,400 divya varshas make one Dvapara Yuga.
  • 1,200 divya varsha make one Kali Yuga.

    All the yugas together total to 12,000 divya varshas. This one cycle of all the yugas makes one Maha-Yuga or Chatur-Yuga. One Manvantara=71 Maha-yugas, or 306,720,000 human years. One Kalpa, or cycle of creation, preservation, and destruction=14 manvantaras. and thus the cycle of time continues.

    At the beginning of each manvantara, a Manu appears and codifies all ethical and social regulations to be followed during the manvantara. The Manu whose code is currently being followed is Vaivasvata Manu, who is the seventh in the line of the cycle of 14 Manus. The six Manus who preceded Vaivasvata Manu were: Svayambhuva, Svarochisha, Uttama, Tamasa, Raivata and Chakshusha. The seven who will follow Vaivasvata Manu are: Savarni, Daksha-savarni, Brahma-savarni, Dharma-savarni, Rudra-savarni, Deva-savarni and Indra-savarni.

Extracted from a Hindu holy granth.

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By Kamlesh Tripathi

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https://kamleshsujata.wordpress.com

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Share if you like it

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Shravan Charity Mission is an NGO that works for poor children suffering from life threatening diseases. Should you wish to donate for the cause the bank details are given below:

NAME OF ACCOUNT: SHRAVAN CHARITY MISSION

Account no: 680510110004635 (BANK OF INDIA)

IFSC code: BKID0006805

*

Our publications

GLOOM BEHIND THE SMILE

(Archived in 7 prestigious libraries of the US, including, Harvard University and Library of Congress. It can also be accessed in MIT through Worldcat.org. Besides, it is also available for reading in Libraries and archives of Canada and Cancer Aid and Research Foundation Mumbai)  

ONE TO TANGO … RIA’S ODYSSEY

(Archived in Connemara Library, Chennai and Delhi Public Library, GOI, Ministry of Culture)

AADAB LUCKNOW … FOND MEMORIES

(Launched in Lucknow International Literary Festival 2014)

REFRACTIONS … FROM THE PRISM OF GOD

(Co-published by Cankids–Kidscan, a pan India NGO and Shravan Charity Mission, that works for Child cancer in India. The book is endorsed by Ms Preetha Reddy, MD Apollo Hospitals Group. Book was launched in Lucknow International Literary Festival 2016)

(CAN BE BOUGHT FROM ON LINE BOOK STORES OR WRITE TO US FOR COPIES)

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EVEN#WOMEN #MPs NEED TO BE REMINDED ABOUT ARCHAIC #ABORTION LAWS IN INDIA

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By Kamlesh Tripathi

 

 

    There are 544 members in the 16th Lok Sabha, and 244 members in the Rajya Sabha, which totals up to 788 MPs. Out of this there are 93 women MPs. That includes the powerful speaker of Lok-Sabha who happens to be a lady. And, yet they don’t have the time and will, and needed to be reminded about the draft Medical Termination of Pregnancy (Amendment) Bill, 2014. Pending for a long time now. I am more than sure they all understand the seriousness about abortion laws. Especially, when the foetus has abnormalities or is an ugly consequence of a rape. The editorial in Times of India is an apt reminder not only to our women MPs, who should use women power to get the bill through but even to all our legislators. Currently the apex courts are doing the job of legislators. Read the article below.

IT’S HER BODY

Today’s society and science demand an upgrade of the abortion law 1971

    Parliament’s lackluster pace of legislating leaves citizens suffering various outdated laws. Two cases in the courts this week draw attention to the human costs of a delay in amending the Medical Termination of Pregnancy Act, 1971—even though an updated draft has been on the table for years. Both cases concern the medical terminations of pregnancy being permitted only up to 20 weeks, a limit that made sense in terms of society and science four decades ago but is seriously out of step with the many developments since. When law’s failure to keep pace with science and global best practices becomes the cause of citizen’s suffering, its very purpose is subverted.

In one case on Monday the Supreme Court allowed a rape survivor to terminate her 24-week old pregnancy. This is the first judicially sanctioned abortion beyond 20 weeks. It followed upon a medical board reporting severe abnormalities in the foetus and its threatening implications for the petitioner. The point of note is that medical technology today can disclose much more information about the foetus after 20 weeks than earlier. Plus, it can make termination of the pregnancy safe for the carrying woman even at 24 weeks.

In another case also on Monday the Delhi high court granted similar relief to a teenaged rape survivor, provided an AIIMS medical panel certifies that the abortion of her 25-week foetus would be safe for this minor. Attorney General Mukul Rohatgi told the apex court that the existing law, with its 2002 amendment, is adequate to handling pregnancy complications warranting abortion after 20 weeks. But the above two cases show that women stuck in such a situation have to seek an exception through the courts, which imposes additional trauma upon women who are already traumatized. Given the logjam at our courts, this also leaves their life in a race against time.

The draft Medical Termination of Pregnancy (Amendment) Bill, 2014 provides for abortion beyond 20 weeks under well defined conditions such as if mother’s life is endangered or the pregnancy is caused by rape. Centre should push for this updated legislation instead of upholding a status quo scripted four decades ago. Medical opinion and women’s groups are agreed and it is not even politically contentious. Every delay in passing an upgrade endangers many women’s lives.

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THE TWO MAJOR HISTORICAL EPICS IN HINDUISM-VALMIKI, TULSIDAS AND VED VYAS

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    Had it not been for the ultimate epic writers and sages such as Valmiki and Tulsidas who wrote Ramayan, and Ved Vyas who wrote Mahabharat. Hinduism would have remained incomplete and perhaps in the confines of God alone. It is only because of these great all time writers. The history of Hinduism has spread so comprehensively all across the world since inception.

    Ramayan and Mahabharat are the two historical sagas referred as Itihas (history) in Hinduism. That serves as the eternal inspiration for humanity and is considered as the putative and exemplary realization of the four … purusharthas (efforts): Dharma (righteous and dutiful) Artha (wealth) Kama (desire and fulfillment) and Moksha (liberation).

    Ramayan in the real sense is the ‘abode of Lord Ram’ and is smaller of the two great works. The tireless epic mirrors the highest ideals of Hindu tradition, culture and civilization. The story relates to Treta Yug (one of the four ages of the world) and centers on Ram. The prince of Ayodhya and the incarnation of Lord Vishnu, and his wife Sita as the incarnation of Mother Lakshmi. Ramayan sings the glory of Lord Ram and advises humanity on how to lead a fulfilling life and attain the four purusharthas. The epic is profound and timeless in its popularity. It teaches with the analogy of symbolism. As to how an individual can evolve into greatness and perfection.

    Sage Valmiki’s Ramayana has been translated into most Indian languages, as well as several foreign languages, including Russian. It consists of 24,000 stanzas in seven cantos, and depicts Rama as the ideal king, son, brother, friend, and husband. In Bharat, Lakshman, and Shatrughan, we see exemplified ideal brothers. In Sita, we have the purest flower of Indian womanhood. Who is devoted to her Lord in thought, word, and deed.

    Ramayana is an ideal textbook of morals and values. That inspires nobler dimensions of character and conduct. Other noteworthy and famous versions of Ramayana include Sage Veda Vyasa’s Adhyatma Ramayana, Goswami Tulsidasa’s Shri Ramcharitamanas (Tulsi Ramayana), and Kambar’s Kamba Ramayana.

    Mahabharat on the other hand is an epic. That is more than eight times the size of Homer’s Iliad and Odyssey combined. In philosophical content it is unparalleled to any other literary work in the world. This grand book of knowledge contains more than 100,000 stanzas in 18 chapters and is the work of the renowned Sage Veda Vyasa.

    The underlying theme of Mahabharata is yato dharma tato jayah, “where there is dharma, there is victory.” Indicating the ultimate triumph of good over evil and the establishment of righteousness.

    The story unfolds toward the end of Dvapara Yuga and describes the genealogy and events leading up to, and after, the familial war between the royal cousins.

    The story is used as a vehicle. To convey eternal philosophical truths of the highest order. It is said, “that which is in Mahabharata can be seen elsewhere, but that which is not there cannot be seen anywhere else.” This gives an idea of the comprehensiveness of subjects in the epic. Which is full of lofty instructions on all aspects of human life and endeavour—an inspiring saga of India’s past glory, portraying all that is great and noble in humanity.

    The guiding spirit throughout the epic is the divine figure of Lord Krishna. Who brings the pure and the righteous to Himself, and destroys the evil and the evildoers. Shrimad Bhagwad Gita or the “Lord’s Song” is part of Mahabharata.

 

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Posted by Kamlesh Tripathi

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                                                   https://kamleshsujata.wordpress.com

     *

Share if you like it

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Shravan Charity Mission is an NGO that works for poor children suffering from life threatening diseases. Should you wish to donate for the cause the bank details are given below:

NAME OF ACCOUNT: SHRAVAN CHARITY MISSION

Account no: 680510110004635 (BANK OF INDIA)

IFSC code: BKID0006805

*

Our publications

GLOOM BEHIND THE SMILE

ONE TO TANGO … RIA’S ODYSSEY

AADAB LUCKNOW … FOND MEMORIES

REFRACTIONS … FROM THE PRISM OF GOD

(CAN BE BOUGHT FROM ON LINE BOOK STORES OR WRITE TO US FOR COPIES)

*****