Category Archives: general knowledge

Gorakhpur-The Cambridge and Oxford of Hindi language

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GORAKHPUR LIT-FEST ON 10TH & 11TH FEB, 2018

 

    In the present context when it comes to English. I’m reminded of its illustrious fountainhead, that is, Oxford and Cambridge. It was from there that the language flourished and travelled all across the globe. In the same manner when I think of present day Urdu. I’m reminded of Lucknow, Delhi, Agra, Hyderabad, and even some Urdu centric cities of Pakistan. That cradled and nourished the language to par-excellence. More than, any other city in the world and therefore they happen to be its nerve centre.

    In Gorakhpur … I saw that happening to Hindi. So, I would call it—‘The Cambridge and Oxford of Hindi language.’ In the two days that I spent there, participating in the Lit-Fest. It was Hindi-Hindi all the way and the best of it that I had heard up till now. So, the point to note is. Gorakhpur, which is otherwise a small town, happens to be a defining pivot of the Hindi language that is spoken by 300 million people across the world and is the fourth most spoken language of the world.

    But, even in that loud cheer of Hindi. The organizers had done well by including, a rich, regional Indian language, such as Bengali. And the lit-fest platter became even more spicy with the inclusion of Nepali, a SAARC lingo and of course in the presence of the ever green language—English.

    So, amid the composite cheer of these languages, my new title ‘Typical Tale of an Indian Salesman’ was launched in the presence of, senior journalist in Indian Parliament, Rahul Dev; film personality Raja Bundela; renowned Hindi author Dr Vidya Bindu Singh; and ex-M.P. Kanak Rekha Singh.

    The book is now available for sale in Amazon, Flipkart, Onlinegatha and other stores both in paper-back and e-book format.

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By Kamlesh Tripathi

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https://kamleshsujata.wordpress.com

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Share it if you like it

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Shravan Charity Mission is an NGO that works for poor children suffering from life threatening diseases. Should you wish to donate for the cause the bank details are given below:

NAME OF ACCOUNT: SHRAVAN CHARITY MISSION

Account no: 680510110004635 (BANK OF INDIA)

IFSC code: BKID0006805

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Our publications

GLOOM BEHIND THE SMILE

(The book is about a young cancer patient. Now archived in 7 prestigious libraries of the US, including, Harvard University and Library of Congress. It can also be accessed in MIT through Worldcat.org. Besides, it is also available for reading in Libraries and archives of Canada and Cancer Aid and Research Foundation Mumbai)  

ONE TO TANGO … RIA’S ODYSSEY

(Is a book on ‘singlehood’ about a Delhi girl now archived in Connemara Library, Chennai and Delhi Public Library, GOI, Ministry of Culture, Delhi)

AADAB LUCKNOW … FOND MEMORIES

(Is a fiction written around the great city of Nawabs—Lucknow. It describes Lucknow in great detail and also talks about its Hindu-Muslim amity. That happens to be its undying characteristic. The book was launched in Lucknow International Literary Festival of 2014)

REFRACTIONS … FROM THE PRISM OF GOD

(Co-published by Cankids–Kidscan, a pan India NGO and Shravan Charity Mission, that works for Child cancer in India. The book is endorsed by Ms Preetha Reddy, MD Apollo Hospitals Group. It was launched in Lucknow International Literary Festival 2016)

TYPICAL TALE OF AN INDIAN SALESMAN

(Is a story of an Indian salesman who is, humbly qualified. Yet he fights his ways through unceasing uncertainties to reach the top. A good read not only for salesmen. The book was launched on 10th February, 2018 in Gorakhpur Lit-Fest. Now available in Amazon, Flipkart and Onlinegatha

(ALL THE ABOVE TITLES ARE AVAILABLE FOR SALE IN AMAZON, FLIPKART AND OTHER ONLINE STORES OR YOU COULD EVEN WRITE TO US FOR A COPY)

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BOOK LAUNCH: TYPICAL TALE OF AN INDIAN SALESMAN

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(Now available in both e-book and paperback in Amazon, Flipkart and onlinegatha)

    ‘Salesman’ is the living isthmus between the consumer and the distant plant. He is the ebullient performer between the two that brings about the market place happening. Therefore, it’ll only be right to say that, ‘a company is known by the salesman it keeps.’

    ‘Typical tale of an Indian Salesman’ is one such story of an Indian salesman Sooraj Chowdhary who hails from a small city. He has no coveted Ivy League qualification barring a B.A. degree. So, he struggles initially in life. But finally manages to join the Indian Corporate Inc as a salesman. Where, he works his way up, through countless uncertainties. To, finally come out victorious. During his long corporate journey, he works in several metros, state capitals, small towns and even rural belts. He also works for various industries and assignments and at various levels.

    The book takes you through the humongous markets of North, West and South of the Indian mainland, and even the island market of Andaman and Nicobar, located across the eastern shore of India. It starts with the modest beginning of the protagonist, but soon zooms into a success story. All along it tunnels through the customer, channel partner and the marketer. It also tussles between the front line sales offices and the head office. Where, you can almost feel a hands-on picturisation. 

    The book even showcases the juggernaut of the Indian Corporate vis-a-vis the complexities of India. It explains in great detail. What it takes for a salesman. To deliver, even, a packet of salt to the consumer, in his neighbourhood market.

    Written in fiction format it narrates in depth, the professional nuances of a salesman’s career. It explains in great detail, that apart from achieving billing, collection and market share—the magic numbers called targets. A salesman is also supposed to nurture new relationships with consumers to build long term customer base. 

    The book covers in great practicality, aspects that the protagonist-salesman, comes across, while functioning in his day-to-day job. So every lesson of marketing and sales is meticulously described in the book as a job function. To sensitise you. I’m giving below a few such points: 

-Direct selling, field work, learning from Chandni Chowk the wholesale market of Delhi.
-Fight for market leadership, Billing, collection, market share, outstanding, market forecasts, carpet bombing—marketing strategy
-Retail, wholesale, B2B, B2C
-Power of training, formal and informal learnings
-‘Process’ the 5th ‘P’ of marketing
-Customer meets
-Relocation, job changes
-Channel management, dealer development, dealer awards, rise and fall of dealerships, new generation in dealerships, franchisee appointments
-Product launches
-Boss subordinate relationship
-Executive versus entrepreneur in a salesman
-Building your own brand equity
-Sting of decision making
-Rare customer interface
-Encounter with market malady
-The power of TEVIIS—trust, ethics, value, integrity, innovation and value
-Avoid operating as a lone ranger
-Competition
-The power of initiative
-Team spirit
-The power of PAPs—Personal Audit points
-Strategy and tactics
-SCM challenges
-How to handle pressure
-Head Office vs front line sales
-Global challenges
-CRM, ERP
-Business communication
-Gift of the gab
-Career direction not always in your hands
-Projects and start-ups
-Manpower training
-Speak your mind
-Business opportunism
-Business diversification
-The rat race
-Learn to remember the salesman
-Political leader vs business leader
-Disconnect between education and employability 
The narration has chapters and within that sub-chapters to keep the focus of the reader in alignment.
The book is written by a salesman and is a tribute to his fraternity
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By Kamlesh Tripathi

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https://kamleshsujata.wordpress.com

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Share if you like it

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Shravan Charity Mission is an NGO that works for poor children suffering from life threatening diseases. Should you wish to donate for the cause the bank details are given below:

NAME OF ACCOUNT: SHRAVAN CHARITY MISSION

Account no: 680510110004635 (BANK OF INDIA)

IFSC code: BKID0006805

*

Our publications

GLOOM BEHIND THE SMILE

(Archived in 7 prestigious libraries of the US, including, Harvard University and Library of Congress. It can also be accessed in MIT through Worldcat.org. Besides, it is also available for reading in Libraries and archives of Canada and Cancer Aid and Research Foundation Mumbai)  

ONE TO TANGO … RIA’S ODYSSEY

(Archived in Connemara Library, Chennai and Delhi Public Library, GOI, Ministry of Culture)

AADAB LUCKNOW … FOND MEMORIES

(Launched in Lucknow International Literary Festival 2014)

REFRACTIONS … FROM THE PRISM OF GOD

(Co-published by Cankids–Kidscan, a pan India NGO and Shravan Charity Mission, that works for Child cancer in India. The book is endorsed by Ms Preetha Reddy, MD Apollo Hospitals Group. Book was launched in Lucknow International Literary Festival 2016)

(CAN BE BOUGHT FROM ON LINE BOOK STORES OR WRITE TO US FOR COPIES)

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INTERESTING FACTS–040917

Copyright@shravancharitymission

 

 

1.   In the world scenario India is very important because of its size. So, for the world to do well, India needs to do well.

2.   India is one of the world’s most flood prone countries with 113 million people exposed to it. According to a UN report India’s average annual economic loss due to disasters is estimated to be $9.8 billion, out of which more than $7 billion loss is due to floods.

3.   Around 30% Americans get less than seven hours of sleep per night, and among them in case of single mothers the figure rises to 47%.

4.   Bengaluru was once a city of 2,500 lakes. It boasted of an efficient and strong water drainage system of interconnected lakes. If one lake overflowed, water would automatically flow to another lake. But with increasing encroachment and solid wastes blocking the channels, floodwater cannot flow to the next water body.

5.    Hyderabad has reported extinction of 375 lakes and in Delhi out of 611 water bodies 274 bodies have dried up due to neglect and exploitation.

6.   In India Waqf properties have become reservoirs of corruption, instead of being a resource to serve the poor in the community.

7.    Indian Railways: 2016-17 period saw more people die in derailments than in any of the last 17 years. And of the 586 rail accidents in the last five years, around 53% were due to derailments.

8.   Japan’s Shinkansen ‘bullet’ trains have been operating without fatality for over 50 years.

9.     In India more than 85% of its train accidents are ascribed to human failure

10.                      Alignment of sun, moon, and earth causes the eclipse.

11.The one river in the country that did not reach the ocean was the Lavanyavati in Rajasthan which dried up in the desert.

12.                       The Ganga and the Indus are now among the most endangered rivers on the planet.

13.                       The kaveri is probably 40% of what it used to be 50 years ago.

14.                       For the last Kumbha mela in Ujjain, water had to be pumped in from the narmada to create an artificial river, because there was no water in the kshipra river.

15.                       Smaller rivulets of India don’t even reach the main river, they dry up along the way because of the blockades.

16.                       Human body is 72% water.

17.                       Agriculture contributes about 17% of the GDP but employs around 50% of the country’s workforce.

18.                      Of the 7132 cases of stalking registered in 2016 only 379 resulted in convictions—a rate of only 5%.

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By Kamlesh Tripathi

*

https://kamleshsujata.wordpress.com

*

Share if you like it

*

Shravan Charity Mission is an NGO that works for poor children suffering from life threatening diseases. Should you wish to donate for the cause the bank details are given below:

NAME OF ACCOUNT: SHRAVAN CHARITY MISSION

Account no: 680510110004635 (BANK OF INDIA)

IFSC code: BKID0006805

*

Our publications

GLOOM BEHIND THE SMILE

(Archived in 7 prestigious libraries of the US, including, Harvard University and Library of Congress. It can also be accessed in MIT through Worldcat.org. Besides, it is also available for reading in Libraries and archives of Canada and Cancer Aid and Research Foundation Mumbai)  

ONE TO TANGO … RIA’S ODYSSEY

(Archived in Connemara Library, Chennai and Delhi Public Library, GOI, Ministry of Culture)

AADAB LUCKNOW … FOND MEMORIES

(Launched in Lucknow International Literary Festival 2014)

REFRACTIONS … FROM THE PRISM OF GOD

(Co-published by Cankids–Kidscan, a pan India NGO and Shravan Charity Mission, that works for Child cancer in India. The book is endorsed by Ms Preetha Reddy, MD Apollo Hospitals Group. Book was launched in Lucknow International Literary Festival 2016)

(CAN BE BOUGHT FROM ON LINE BOOK STORES OR WRITE TO US FOR COPIES)

*****

KULDHARA—JAISALMER: THE HAUNT REMAINS EVEN AFTER CENTURIES

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By Kamlesh Tripathi

 

    Ghost towns and villages have often held our attention. But simultaneously, they have also unleashed our imagination to some hair-raising and eerie trepidation. So, its character remains quite aloof, from the oppressive ruins of the rich and arrogant castles and fortresses. One such village, nests in Kuldhara. Located in the deep-seated, desert region of Western Rajasthan. Where, when, you stand under the hot striking sun. You might not get to see a single human form till the horizon. In all earnest, such unspeaking and phantom towns and villages may not utter a complaining word. But then they scream about the enduring trauma. Their inhabitants might have undergone and that gives us a chance to peep into their harrowing lives.

    Rajasthan brims in the expanse of Thar desert. It has no dearth of ghost villages. That remains almost unpeopled for various reasons. But only a few of them have got as much attention as Bhangarh and Kuldhara. Perhaps, due to the myths attached to them. So, while we were in Jaisalmer. It was only natural for us to undertake the sightseeing of Kuldhara.

    It simmers in deep desolate wilderness, at about 18 km, west of Jaisalmer. And it certainly has a story to tell. Where, we came across a young boy named Bhairo Sharma. Who narrated the aghast episode, in an emotional tone. Is when, I reflected after many years. That there was someone doing justice to the forgotten art of storytelling.

    It happened some 300 years ago. When, Kuldhara was a prosperous village. Where, Paliwal Brahmins used to reside under the state of Jaisalmer. The story thus throws up a spine-chilling feel. When, the evil eyes of Salim Singh. The all powerful tyrant and debauch Prime Minister of the state. Fell for the daughter of the village head and desired to marry her by force. He then threatened the entire village of grave consequences, if they did not acquiesce to his wishes.  

    The entire clan of Paliwals then lived in those 85 villages. They forthwith held a council. Where, it was decided, instead of acceding, to the demands of the depraved Prime Minister. They would abandon and leave their village and homeland. To, save the honour and purity of their daughter from the evil eyes of the monster. And soon, they all left for good. But before departing they ordained a powerful curse on Kuldhara. That, after them, no one else shall ever be able to settle and prosper in the village. And from that day onwards the village remains unoccupied, barren and even deserted. It gives an isolated and godforsaken look. Perhaps, quite similar to the unseen yet imagined faces of the residents of those times, that too, centuries ago. It is also believed. People who have attempted to stay here overnight have been haunted away by some strange and abnormal phenomenon.

    The parallel story that runs and appears to be as plausible as the first one is. Salim Singh, upon not being obliged by the Paliwals raised the taxes to such an extent. That it became practically unbearable for the local community to survive in the village. So they decided to migrate to greener pastures. However, people are more inclined to believe the first story. That has a tinge of both romance and mysticism in it.

    The dilapidated and tale-telling houses and monuments are now maintained by Archaeological Survey of India (ASI). One can enter the village only after purchasing tickets. After which you drive along the prime street. That appears to be the main boulevard of the settlement. Where, even now, after centuries one feels gloomy and sad. For there are rows of houses with their roofs fallen. And the ruined walls give a sense of melancholic past. Where, the entire landscape is dry, dusty and sun stricken. That conveys a blaring message of atrocious human upheavels. Even, when, the era denoted happiness through righteousness.

    We halted at a location. That appeared to be the hub of the rustic village. Just close by there was a house in good upkeep. We entered to see the rooms that were well maintained. Following the path we even went up the stairs and up to the roof. From where, the entire village was visible. Though, I could not feel any supernatural presence. Yet that element of sombreness struck me while I was there. One could say the animation was missing. Ladies in the group could not withstand the countenance of destruction and slowly walked away.  I could even sight an unvisited and left alone temple nearby. Gradually, we cruised past the ruins available in the form of the crumbling walls. For a moment, it gave me a flash of those lives that lived there centuries ago. There was definitely something spine chilling even when everything around was so calm and unmoved. Perhaps, the collective curse of those helpless citizens was still pulsating there. Where, everything was looking so recent. And one got a feel as if someone was calling you from behind those dilapidated houses.

    Kuldhara remains a desolate place with forlorn looks. Curses don’t die so soon, they say. The ambience brings across a kind of seeping sadness to your heart. Especially, when, one thinks of the unfortunate people.  Who, were forced to leave the land of their forefathers. However the place doesn’t appear to be spooky for any other reason barring the wicked crime spelt in the story.

    Even, when, the ASI has taken over the settlement. It remains to be seen if this village will ever flourish. By flourish I mean—will the lineage of the people, who left generations back. Ever come together to salvage their motherland. And last but not the least. Was this a quintessential example of a migration that moved a civilised settlement? My answer would be no.

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BEAUTIFUL QUOTES & LOVELY LINES

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The future is limitless—Peter Thiel
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A right cause never fails- M K Gandhi
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“Old soldiers never die, they simply fade away” is an old
wartime ballad
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How can you remember someone you cannot forget—
Badrinath Singh
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‘To error is human; to forgive, divine’—Alexander Pope,
English Poet
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The soldier above all others prays for peace—Douglas
Macarthur
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Good words are worth much, and cost little—George Herbert
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Desire is necessary to initiate action
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Mahabharata unlike Ramayana is not about an ideal man. It
focuses on ethical and moral conflicts-faced in the pursuit of
dharma
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What goes around really comes around
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‘Now that we have made Italy let us make Italians’—Massimo
d’Azeglio
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The more people think only of themselves, the more
exclusive they become, and less able they become to accept
others
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Not every flower in a plant becomes fruit
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Fate’s ironic way of fighting the balance
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Krishna is in all and we all are in Krishna
One-in-all and all-in-one is Krishna
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Prices are the only thing that defy the law of gravity

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The promise given was a necessity of the past, the word
broken is a necessity of the present—Machiavelli
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‘What is a cynic? A man who knows the price of everything
and value of nothing’—OSCAR WILDE

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Posted by Kamlesh Tripathi

*

https://kamleshsujata.wordpress.com

*

Share if you like it

*

Shravan Charity Mission is an NGO that works for poor children suffering from life threatening diseases. Should you wish to donate for the cause the bank details are given below:

NAME OF ACCOUNT: SHRAVAN CHARITY MISSION

Account no: 680510110004635 (BANK OF INDIA)

IFSC code: BKID0006805

*

Our publications

GLOOM BEHIND THE SMILE

ONE TO TANGO … RIA’S ODYSSEY

AADAB LUCKNOW … FOND MEMORIES

REFRACTIONS … FROM THE PRISM OF GOD

(CAN BE BOUGHT FROM ON LINE BOOK STORES OR WRITE TO US FOR COPIES)

*****

 

BEAUTIFUL LINES & INTERESTING THOUGHTS

Copyright@shravancharitymission

Kamlesh Tripathi

 

 

  • Mind without heart, intelligence without conduct, cleverness without goodness are tools, but only for mischief.
  • Behave the way you can always behave—Annonymous.
  • Who is rich? He that is content. Who is that? Nobody—Benjamin Franklin
  • I would not wish any companion in the world but you—Shakespeare.
  • The Rig Veda tells us: “Let noble thoughts come to us from everywhere.”
  • “Nobody can tell what I suffer! But it is always so. Those who do not complain are never pitied.”
    ― Jane AustenPride and Prejudice
  • “The wound is the place where the Light enters you.”
    ― Jalaluddin Rumi
  • “One thing you can’t hide – is when you’re crippled inside.”
    ― John Lennon
  • Justice as Lord Atkin said is “no cloistered virtue”
  • Sometimes words that fail to make their effect at the time are remembered later—Agatha Christie
  • Give your clients the earliest delivery consistent with quality—whatever the inconvenience to us—Arthur Nielson
  • Opportunities present themselves every day. You just have to be alert and ready to act.—MARK OSTROFSKY, US ENTREPRENEUR
  • Sometimes it’s worse to win a fight than to lose—Billie Holiday
  • The best of us must sometimes eat our words—JK Rowling
  • The only thing that will redeem mankind is cooperation—BERTRAND RUSSELL
  • What is a cynic? A man who knows the price of everything and value of nothing—Oscar Wilde
  • Slow down and steady up—annonymous
  • All work and no play/makes Jack a dull boy. To which the cautionary response goes ‘All play and no work/ Makes Jack a mere toy.’ TOI Editorial
  • Don’t talk about yourself; it will be done when you leave—Wilson Mazner, US playwright
  • Never hate your enemies. It affects your judgement- Mario Puzo- Godfather
  • We’ve seen over time that countries that have the best economic growth are those that have good governance- Ramez Naam US writer
  • A conversation is a dialogue, not a monologue, That’s why there are so few good conversations- Truman
  • History does not repeat itself exactly but, as Mark Twain put it, it often rhymes.
  • If you have built castles in the air … now put the foundations under them—Henry David Thoureau
  • Margaret Thatcher’s warning that those standing in the middle of the road get run over.
  • The way to crush the bourgeoisie is to grind them between the millstones of taxation and inflation—Vladmir Lenin.
  • Carlyle- the history of the world is but biography of great men.’ Some so called great men have their hands deep in blood.
  • Boris Pasternak author of Dr Zhivago called silence the best sound on earth’
  • The greatest obstacle to excellence is you! A caddy once told a champion golfer, “There’s a perfect shot waiting out there. All you have to do is to get yourself out of the way.”
  • In short, I will part with anything for you but you- Mary Wortley Montagu, Writer.
  • There are good times and there are bad times, but one must never forget the hard times—Annonymous.
  • When a father gives to his son, both laugh; when a son gives to his father, both cry—William Shakespeare.
  • Kritam Lokham Purushoabhijayte- Man himself builds his own world.
  • The boxer Muhammad Ali refused to wear his seat-belt on a plane. “Superman doesn’t need a belt,” he insisted. Tying his belt for him, the stewardess replied, “Superman doesn’t need a plane either.”
  • Exhibitionists: at a wedding they want to be the bride. At a funeral the corpse. Julius Caesar who was an incorrigible egotist, was kidnapped when he was a child. He was held for a ransom of 11,000 gold pieces. Horrified exhorted his captors to raise the sum to 250,000 gold pieces so as to preserve his prestige.
  • You only find out who is swimming naked when the tide goes out—Warren Buffet
  • The whole of western science has developed from Greek philosophy. It stands on the foundations of Greek Philosophy, and one of Greek philosophy’s basic beliefs is that time travels in a straight line.
  • The bread that falls off your plate nearly always lands on the buttered side.
  • Evil manners live in brass, but our virtues we write in water.
  • There is a Mexican saying that we die three deaths: the first time we die is when our bodies die. The second is when our bodies are lowered into the earth, out of sight. The third time we die is when our loved ones forget us.
  • Being different and thinking different makes a person unforgettable. History does not remember the forgettable.- Suzy Kassem, US writer.

 

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HAPPENING WORLD–FACTS & PROJECTIONS

Copyright@shravancharitymission

By Kamlesh Tripathi

 

 

By some accounts the Pakistani army chief bears a personal grudge against India—his uncle was killed in the 1965 war and his brother in the 1971

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India is known for producing CEOs of Google, Microsoft, Pepsico, Mastercard, Deutsche Bank, etc. And Pakistan? For hoisting heads of Al-qaida, Taliban, Lashkar-e-Taiba, Jaish-e-Muhammed, Haqqani group etc.

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Gandhi arrived in South Africa in 1893 at the age of 23. Within a week he collided head on with racism. His immediate response was to flee the country that so degraded people of colour, but then his inner resilience overpowered him with a sense of mission, and he stayed to redeem the dignity of the racially exploited, to pave the way for the liberation of the colonised the world over and to develop a blueprint for a new social order. He left 21 years later, a near Mahatma (great soul).

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Valmiki gave up life as a robber and meditated for years in penance before he went up to compose the epic Ramayana. He is now revered as the ‘Adi Kavi,’ or the first poet, as he is said to have invented the ‘Shloka,’ the first verse, which defined the form of Sanskrit poetry.

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The trade unions represent 15% of the workforce in the organised sector. 85% represents the unorganised sector.

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Cities are our engines of growth and contribute around 63% of India’s GDP.

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Chikungunya was discovered in 1952, in Tanganyika. Indian dengue was first recorded in Madras in 1780, but the first proven epidemic was in west Bengal, 1963-64, also proving its first chief minister, BC Roy’s claim: ‘What Calcutta does today, the rest of India does tomorrow.’

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Total incidents of violent crime in UP fell dramatically from 1999 to 2003 at the rate of 16% per annum. This period coincided with the time when BJP was in power in the state. However, since 2003 when either BSP or SP have been in power, violent crimes in UP have increased significantly at the rate of over 7%. In comparison Bihar which is the closest to UP in its record of crimes, registered increase in violent crimes at 3% per annum.

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In 2014, violent crime in UP was 25% more than in Bihar.

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India’s direct tax payers form part of a narrow base which contributes more than 50% of the Centre’s total tax revenue.

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In 2012-13, tax department’s data showed that 28.9 million individuals filed tax returns, of whom only about 1.6 million people claimed income above Rs 1 million. When this number is juxtaposed with the 2.6 million cars sold the same year.

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India’s income tax base is unnaturally narrow. It spends less than a rupee to collect Rs 100 of direct tax.

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Indian railways continues to be the lifeline of the nation with over 800 crore trips annually

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Air travel in India is likely to continue to grow quickly for the next 10-12 years. To support this growth, investment in airports is expected to be upwards of Rs 2.5 lakh crore. Around 700 planes could be added to our current fleet of around 450 planes totalling an investment of Rs 3 lakh crores.

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Currently the aviation sector is estimated to directly employ 2 lakh people and 12 lakh people across various parts of the value chain, a multiple of 5.8x. in the next decade the sector could employ more than 5 lakh people directly and 30 lakh overall.

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From more than 90% of aspirants failing the central Teacher’s eligibility test year after year, to teacher absenteeism touching as high as 40% in the poorest states, to the prevalence of English Teachers who just can’t speak English. All around there are signs that teacher recruitment in India is in a bad shape.

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Environment: while the Montreal Protocal is now ratified by 197 countries, the Paris agreement has been ratified by 63 countries representing 52.11% of global greenhouse emissions

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The world bank/IMF estimates the size of Indian economy in 2016 at 2.28 trillion $ making it the world’s 7th largest. At $270 billion in 2015, Pakistan is the world’s 38th largest. India’s export of merchandise has powered past 300$ billion and is closing on $500 billion, if you count services, despite a slowdown in 2016. Pakistan’s exports are straining to get past #30 billion. India’s foreign exchange reserves stand at $367 billion; Pakistan is at $20 billion.

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Pakistan is one fourth of India’s size. Has a sixth of its population and poses an equal. Yet India cannot rid itself of Pakistani pestilence.

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Pakistan’s ministry of Overseas told the country’s legislature this week that Saudi Arabia and UAE together hosted nearly 90% of the total Pakistani workforce of 9,48,000 sent overseas last year. Jobs provided to Pakistani by some other counties: Germany 44, Turkey 57, Singapore 68, Japan 84, UK 261 and USA 350.

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