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Story: WASHERMAN AND THE DONKEY

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    There was once a lazy and a wicked dhobi (washerman) by the name of Nankau. He had an obedient and a long serving donkey at home. Whom he utilized, for transporting clothes to the banks of the nearby river, early in the morning for washing. Further, during the day he handed him over to his friend for a fixed amount. Who happened to be a contractor. Where, he was utilised for transporting sand from the river bed to his construction site. And, in the evening the listless and obedient animal used to return with his master. With bundles of washed clothes on his back. Devious Nankau, apart from making the donkey do all the work without any rest, even whipped him for small mistakes, and at times he even starved him for minor misdemeanors. But, he never complimented him for any good work. Rather, considered him as the jinx of his life.

    One day Gopal a friend of Nankau came to stay with him for a few days. And during that time he noticed how for no rhyme or reason Nankau whipped the donkey mercilessly and even cursed him loudly and that too quite often.

    One day Gopal asked Nankau. ‘My dear friend what on earth is the matter with you? As I always find you quite irritable, and you often keep whipping this poor soul in great anger for no fault of his. Why do you do this? Especially, when he is so obedient and does all your work?’

    Nankau ruefully replied, ‘arrey yaar! This donkey has been very inauspicious for me. Ever since it walked into my life I have been facing some problem or the other. Enough is enough. I now want to get rid of him, somehow. Even earlier, I tried to sell him but no one seemed interested. Maybe, because, I cursed and criticized him so much, in front of others that no one is ready to touch him even with a barge pole.’

    During his stay Gopal could assess the worth of the donkey. So, one day he told his friend, ‘brother, just in case you are unhappy with him. You could sell him off to me, and instead buy another one for yourself.’

    Nankau was delighted at this God gifted opportunity and didn’t want to lose it. So, he readily agreed, and sold the donkey to Gopal. Who happened to be a kind master and thereon he looked after the animal quite well.

    In the meanwhile Nankau bought a mule for himself. Thinking it will do more work, than the previous animal used to do. And, although, it had been a while since he had sold the donkey. Yet, he couldn’t forget the animal and often used to curse him for all the misfortunes in his life. But, now with the mule around he was hoping his luck would change and he will be a happy man.

    And by now Nankau had passed a couple of lacklustre months with the mule. Who, as compared to the donkey looked tougher, but very reluctantly did as much work as the donkey used to do. So, under the present scenario, Nankau didn’t have the wretched donkey, to curse and blame for his own failures each time things went wrong in his life. Therefore, the nemesis of his life was clearly missing, because the donkey was now someone else’s property. And the mule was too new to be held responsible for any ill luck. In other words he had no voodoo in life whom, he could have cursed for his misfortunes. And, he didn’t have the courage to blame and curse himself for his own mistakes, and this started worrying him beyond compare.

    One day when the mule was transporting sand from the river to the contractor’s site. The hind legs of the mule got stuck in the muddy waters of the river and as a result, it could not move. Soon, it slipped and fell, and fractured its leg, and within a few days the wound developed into gangrene and he died.

    Nankau was shell shocked at the mishap. He now had no means of transporting the clothes meant for washing, and was now constrained to do it on his own back. But then he had limitations. As he couldn’t carry too many clothes. So he started losing business. And, since the mule was now dead. He was also deprived of the daily rent that he used to get from the contractor. And that cheat of a contractor didn’t even bother to pay Nankau any compensation for the dead animal. So overall, he was at a loss of a lifetime.

    Suddenly, he realized, he now had no one to curse for his setbacks. Because, the ultimate anathema of his life—the donkey, stood sold. Therefore, it was not influencing his life anymore. So, the big question now in front of him was, who then was influencing his life if not the donkey?

    He decided to visit his learned friend Gopal for answers. Where, in his house, he once again found the nemesis of his life, the donkey, standing in a healthy and happy state. As Gopal was taking good care of him. Nankau, narrated the sequence of events to him.

   Gopal, first gave him a patient hearing and then said, ‘Dear Nankau, when I visited you last time. I knew you were a victim of your own circumstances. But you always wanted to play the victim card for every adversity that you came across in your life. For which you always wanted a villain whom you could blame and where this speechless donkey came in handy.

    But the real solution of life is to look for the hidden donkey within you, before you start cursing any other donkey outside. Moreover, you are just a human being, who is bound to make mistakes. So, if at all, you need to blame someone for your mistakes, blame the villain in you. And, for that, keep him alive. So that you don’t have to look for a villain outside, like this donkey.

    With this Nankau had got the message of life. He patted the donkey and returned home.

    Moral of the story: We often blame others for our own misfortunes which is not correct. When things start going wrong in your life confront the donkey that lies within you and don’t look for one outside.

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By Kamlesh Tripathi

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Shravan Charity Mission is an NGO that works for poor children suffering from life threatening diseases. Should you wish to donate for the cause the bank details are given below:

NAME OF ACCOUNT: SHRAVAN CHARITY MISSION

Account no: 680510110004635 (BANK OF INDIA)

IFSC code: BKID0006805

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Our publications

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https://kamleshsujata.wordpress.com

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Our publications

GLOOM BEHIND THE SMILE

(Archived in 7 prestigious libraries of the US, including, Harvard University and Library of Congress. It can also be accessed in MIT through Worldcat.org. Besides, it is also available for reading in Libraries and archives of Canada and Cancer Aid and Research Foundation Mumbai)  

ONE TO TANGO … RIA’S ODYSSEY

(Archived in Connemara Library, Chennai and Delhi Public Library, GOI, Ministry of Culture)

AADAB LUCKNOW … FOND MEMORIES

(Launched in Lucknow International Literary Festival 2014)

REFRACTIONS … FROM THE PRISM OF GOD

(Co-published by Cankids–Kidscan, a pan India NGO and Shravan Charity Mission, that works for Child cancer in India. The book is endorsed by Ms Preetha Reddy, MD Apollo Hospitals Group. Book was launched in Lucknow International Literary Festival 2016)

TYPICAL TALE OF AN INDIAN SALESMAN

Story of an Indian salesman who is lowly qualified but fights his ways through uncertainities to reach the top. A good read for all salesmen. Book launched on 10th February, 2018 in Gorakhpur Lit-Fest. Now available in Amazon.com and Flipkart

(CAN BE BOUGHT FROM ON LINE BOOK STORES OR WRITE TO US FOR COPIES)

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Story: God likes simple ways

Copyright with shravancharitymission

 

 

    Once, Kannap, who happened to be the head of the Bheel (tribal) community. Landed up in a temple, located in a remote jungle, after a hunt.

    Temple housed an old idol of Lord Shiva. And upon noticing, the idol to be in a degraded state. Kannap got a little emotional. He was simple person at heart and felt—‘Shiva is alone in this jungle with countless wild and notorious animals. Hope no animal comes in the night and attacks him.’ By now it was evening and getting dark. Concerned, Kannap loaded his bow with an arrow and decided to guard the temple by standing across the door, where he spent the entire night.

    At dawn, Kannap thought of doing puja in the temple. But truly speaking he didn’t know how to perform one. So, he went to the jungle and killed an animal and roasted its flesh on fire for prasad. He then climbed a tree and broke open a honeycomb and collected honey. Thereafter he collected everything in a leaf-bowl and then plucked some flowers and stuck them on his unruly hair and plaits. He then filled his mouth with water from the nearby river and reached the temple to perform his puja. The idol had some dry leaves and flowers rotting on it. Kannap, removed it, with his feet, as his hands were tied up. With one hand he was holding his bow and with the other he was holding the leaf-bowl filled with roasted flesh and honey. He washed the idol with the water in his mouth. And then he pulled out the flowers from his hair and started respectfully placing them in front of Shiva. Thereafter, he placed the leaf bowl in front of the idol. After which, in his simplicity he thought the puja is over, and then with his bow and arrow he started guarding the temple.

    In all of this Kannap forgot about his home, his family, and so much so that he even forgot his hunger and his sleep. In his endeavour to safeguard his beloved God and performing the puja. He as if forgot his world and his own self and even his body.

    But, surprisingly, in that very temple. Every morning a Brahmin also used to come from a distant village to perform puja and after the ritual he used to go back. He normally came when Kannap was away in the forest, hunting. And on finding morsels of flesh in the temple the Brahmin was saddened. He walked up to the river and got some fresh water and cleaned the temple. He bathed again to perform the puja. But this was not a matter pertaining to a particular day. When the Brahmin found, the temple in this condition every morning he decided, ‘today I’ll hide and see as to who is this person who is polluting and soiling the temple every day.’

    Brahmin hid himself in the temple and started gazing to and fro from the camouflage. After a little while he was astounded to see a scary appearing bheel (tribal) carrying a bow and arrow on his shoulders. After seeing him. He did not have the guts to say anything. But when Kannap entered the temple. He was shocked to see that one eye of the idol was bleeding. He slowly kept the leaf-bowl on the ground and started weeping himself—‘Who is this devil who has hurt my God in the eyes?’

    Immediately, Kannap loaded his bow and ran out of the temple. He wanted to kill the person who had inflicted injury upon the idol. But he could find no one. Soon he kept his bow and arrow on the side and started collecting some grass and leaves. And in a little while he had collected a heap. He then returned to the temple and started crushing what he had collected, and started applying it on the eyes of the idol. But even by doing so Kannap was not successful in stopping the bleeding. This made Bheelkumar Kannap extremely uneasy. But just then he remembered what another bheel (tribesman) had once told him—‘In the wound of a person if the same body part of a different person is placed then the wound heals immediately.’ Kannap was happy to remember it. He decided to act immediately. From his quiver he quickly pulled out an arrow and with that he scooped out his own eye. Even, when, it pained to the hilt and placed it on the eye of the idol and pressed it hard. But from his own wound, from where he had pulled out his eye, blood had started oozing out profusely, but he was unaware of the pain. On the contrary he was feeling happy that it had stopped the bleeding from the eye of the idol.

    But the agony was not over yet. As just then the other eye of the idol also started bleeding. But Kannap by now had the therapeutic solution for it. He kept the toe of his foot on that eye of the idol, so that after he scoops his second eye and goes blind it will not be difficult for him to find the second bleeding eye in the idol. And with his arrow he scooped out his second eye. But before that suddenly there was divine illumination in the temple. From the idol, Lord Shiva emanated and embraced Kannap; and said,

    ‘Dear Brahmin! Puja and its complex methods don’t make me happy. What really, makes me happy is the earnest and respectful feelings of a devotee towards me.’ Lord Shiva addressed the Brahmin hiding there. And by now Kannap’s eyes had healed as that became Ashutosh’s (Shiva’s) prasad, and along with him he went to his divine abode. The Brahmin too, because of Bheelkumar Kannap’s simple ways that God liked, got darshan of Lord Shiva.

    And that is why it is said, ‘it is so simple to be happy, but so difficult to be simple.’

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Posted by Kamlesh Tripathi

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https://kamleshsujata.wordpress.com

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Share if you like it

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Shravan Charity Mission is an NGO that works for poor children suffering from life threatening diseases. Should you wish to donate for the cause the bank details are given below:

NAME OF ACCOUNT: SHRAVAN CHARITY MISSION

Account no: 680510110004635 (BANK OF INDIA)

IFSC code: BKID0006805

*

Our publications

GLOOM BEHIND THE SMILE

(Archived in 7 prestigious libraries of the US, including, Harvard University and Library of Congress. It can also be accessed in MIT through Worldcat.org. Besides, it is also available for reading in Libraries and archives of Canada and Cancer Aid and Research Foundation Mumbai)  

ONE TO TANGO … RIA’S ODYSSEY

(Archived in Connemara Library, Chennai and Delhi Public Library, GOI, Ministry of Culture)

AADAB LUCKNOW … FOND MEMORIES

(Launched in Lucknow International Literary Festival 2014)

REFRACTIONS … FROM THE PRISM OF GOD

(Co-published by Cankids–Kidscan, a pan India NGO and Shravan Charity Mission, that works for Child cancer in India. The book is endorsed by Ms Preetha Reddy, MD Apollo Hospitals Group. Book was launched in Lucknow International Literary Festival 2016)

(CAN BE BOUGHT FROM ON LINE BOOK STORES OR WRITE TO US FOR COPIES)

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Short story: Two Ponies

Copyright@shravancharitymission

 

 

 

    Once upon a time there was a trader who had two ponies. He often used to load them with grocery. To market in the nearby villages located in the hills. Once, it so happened, that one of his pony fell sick. But the trader did not come to know of it. He wanted to carry salt, jaggery, pulses and rice to the nearby villages to sell. So, he loaded both of them equally and started on his mission.

    But, while negotiating the uneven hilly terrain. The sick pony was having problems. Soon, they halted for a breather. Is when he said to his fellow pony—‘today I’m not feeling well. Therefore, I’ll drop one of the bags loaded on me, so you keep standing here. When our owner notices that. He might just load it on you, but if you move ahead. The owner will load it back on me. In this manner my load will get reduced for the day and I will be able to come along with you.’

    But the other pony replied—‘why should I take your load? As if, I have lesser load on my back. Sorry, I’ll only carry my share of load.’

    Soon they started again. The sick pony was now quiet and kept walking even when he was feeling extremely sick. And while trudging on the hilly track. Because of his weakness he stumbled into a bolder lying on the road and went off the cliff and rolled down and finally succumbed to his injuries.

    The trader was shocked at the sudden death of his pony. He stood there for a while not knowing what to do. Then he lifted the bags off the dead pony and loaded them on to the other one. Now the pony started repenting and thinking—‘had I listened to my fellow pony and taken some extra load. He wouldn’t have come across this fatal accident and in turn I wouldn’t have had to carry the entire load on my back.

    Moral of the story: A person who doesn’t help others, especially, colleagues while they are in danger have to repent. They are paid back in the same coin.

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Posted by Kamlesh Tripathi

*

https://kamleshsujata.wordpress.com

*

Share if you like it

*

Shravan Charity Mission is an NGO that works for poor children suffering from life threatening diseases. Should you wish to donate for the cause the bank details are given below:

NAME OF ACCOUNT: SHRAVAN CHARITY MISSION

Account no: 680510110004635 (BANK OF INDIA)

IFSC code: BKID0006805

*

Our publications

GLOOM BEHIND THE SMILE

(Archived in 7 prestigious libraries of the US, including, Harvard University and Library of Congress. It can also be accessed in MIT through Worldcat.org. Besides, it is also available for reading in Libraries and archives of Canada and Cancer Aid and Research Foundation Mumbai)

ONE TO TANGO … RIA’S ODYSSEY

(Archived in Connemara Library, Chennai and Delhi Public Library, GOI, Ministry of Culture)

AADAB LUCKNOW … FOND MEMORIES

(Launched in Lucknow International Literary Festival 2014)

REFRACTIONS … FROM THE PRISM OF GOD

(Co-published by Cankids–Kidscan, a pan India NGO and Shravan Charity Mission, that works for Child cancer in India. The book is endorsed by Ms Preetha Reddy, MD Apollo Hospitals Group. Book was launched in Lucknow International Literary Festival 2016)

(CAN BE BOUGHT FROM ON LINE BOOK STORES OR WRITE TO US FOR COPIES)

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