Tag Archives: cinema

THE IRONY OF TASH, MOUSTACHE OR MOOCH

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    Recently a friend of mine ventured into buying a rickety second hand car that was more than 18 feet long, but more than half a decade old. I asked, ‘why this car? Instead, you could have bought a brand new hatchback in the same budget?’ He replied ‘My dear friend you will not understand this, yeh mooch wali gadi hai.’ He, like me, had no mooch but knew all about the varied nuances of a mooch. Another friend of mine since college days, sported a handlebar wider than his face. Just, because he wanted to look like an ostentatious macho, to all those known to him, and like an army specimen, to all the unknown. But sadly, girls rated his fertile front as hideous because of his mooch. From a distance, he was easily recognizable, as one could clearly see only a bushy moustache, walking up and down without a face–so virile was his tash.

    Then, I also knew of a salesman resembling the famous dacoit Veerapan with his deadly moustaches sprouting all over his face. But this was much before Veerapan actually surfaced. The lady customers refused, to be attended by him even when he was very God fearing. Perhaps, he couldn’t have changed the scary image of such a well mustachioed face

        Mel Brooks, American actor, producer and director justifies it well on the silver screen for the select few and goes on to say, ‘A cinema villain essentially needs a moustache, so he can twiddle with it gleefully, as he cooks up his next plan.’ But it still doesn’t make me believe if Moochs, have a direct link with virile manhood.

    Media reports insinuate, Indo-China confrontation is almost over. But then the handlebar-mooch remains, like its sardonic thorn, that is upping the ante. And unless one side droops, the likelihood of a war is very much there. So, not only men, even, countries wear moustaches. But then India happens to be a she country, then how can she have a moustache. And what about China? Well they prefer calling it ‘ancestral land’ … gender neutral to reap the benefit of both the sexes. So then, I don’t think there should be a problem for either of them, to pull out … as ladies needn’t even have a mooch ki ladai. Buy yes, both can behind the scenes give, ‘moochon mein tav’ in front of their countrymen.

    Moustache, no doubt is the royal asset of a man, which is more loyal than his hair. That triggers and circulates his wild airs. And, while, one can see its pontification right below the eyes. He  should not make it the focal point of his false prestige. 

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By Kamlesh Tripathi

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https://kamleshsujata.wordpress.com

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Shravan Charity Mission is an NGO that works for poor children suffering from life threatening diseases. Should you wish to donate for the cause the bank details are given below:

NAME OF ACCOUNT: SHRAVAN CHARITY MISSION

Account no: 680510110004635 (BANK OF INDIA)

IFSC code: BKID0006805

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Our publications

GLOOM BEHIND THE SMILE

ONE TO TANGO … RIA’S ODYSSEY

AADAB LUCKNOW … FOND MEMORIES

REFRACTIONS … FROM THE PRISM OF GOD

(CAN BE BOUGHT FROM ON LINE BOOK STORES OR WRITE TO US FOR COPIES)

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Article: Bollywood between Diamond and Platinum Jubilee

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Bollywood between diamond and Platinum jubilee  

Remake: epic serial ‘Mahabharat’ starring superstars

 

    Bollywood’ is the sobriquet for the Hindi film industry that is based out of Mumbai. The term is also, loosely used, as a synecdoche to refer to the whole of Indian cinema. It has made millions and trillions through movies. And has a huge Indian following. The name has even made ripples abroad. It has now been in existence for more than eighty five years. Raja Harishchandra, was the first silent feature film made by Dadasaheb Phalke in 1913. By 1930s, the Indian Film Industry was producing over 200 films per annum. Since then it has never looked back. It is one of the largest film producers in India. Representing 43% of net box office revenue. While Telugu and Tamil cinema represent 36%. The rest of the regional cinema constitutes 21% as of 2015. It is also one of the largest centers for film production in the world. Formally referred to as ‘Hindi cinema.’ It is one of the biggest movie industries in the world, in terms of the number of people employed and the number of films produced in 2011. Where, over 3.5 billion tickets were sold across the globe. Which in comparison is 900,000 tickets more than Hollywood.

    Hitherto, Bollywood, has functioned quite enviously, under different banners for more than eighty five years. And has given us some wonderful movies. But it is about time. It now comes under one united banner. To give India the entertainment of a lifetime—the real dhamaka of the century.

    It missed the lifetime opportunity of a diamond jubilee celebration. And platinum is still far away. But by then many superstars of today may hang their boots. So now is the right time. To produce a mega serial where all the diggajes of Bollywood can come together and act, and for the sake of Bollywood’s commemoration they should act free. If we delay it further. We may miss out on many such great actors coming together as they may call it a day. The idea is to make them act together in a mega project. Which may not be possible in a three hour movie. I would therefore suggest a remake of the great epic ‘Mahabharat’ which is still the most popular serial ever made in the Indian history.

    Imagine how would you feel watching Mahabharat. Scripted by the all time famous duo of Saleem-Javed as was done in Sholay, music by A.R Rehman, songs by Lata Mangeshkar, Asha Bhonsale, Anuradha Podwal, Anup Jalota and Bhupendra (unfortunately Kishore and Mukesh are no more). And my dream my caste. To name a few would be: Amitabh Bachchan as Bheeshma Pitamah, Nana Patekar as Dronacharya, Anupam Kher as Mahatma Vidur, Ajay Devgun as Krishna, Amir Khan as Karan, Shahrukh Khan as Yudhistir, Salman Khan as Bheem, Kritik Roshan as Arjun, Ranbir Kapur as Nakul, Abhishek Bachchan as Sahdev, Javed Jafri as Shakuni, Danny as Dhritrasth (ideal would have been Amrish Puri, but sad he is no more), Jaya Bachan as Gandhari, Shabana as Kunti, Priyanka Chopra as Draupadi.

These are only few names and characters with my limited knowledge. Once you start detailing it. Many more icons will surface, to take on many more challenging characters of Mahabharat.

But will this ever happen? Well nothing is impossible. The way we like watching Mughle-Azam even after half a century. This serial too shall be watched for time immemorial.

Come on Bollywood. Start thinking about it.

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By Kamlesh Tripathi

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https://kamleshsujata.wordpress.com

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Share if you like it

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Shravan Charity Mission is an NGO that works for poor children suffering from life threatening diseases. Should you wish to donate for the cause the bank details are given below:

NAME OF ACCOUNT: SHRAVAN CHARITY MISSION

Account no: 680510110004635 (BANK OF INDIA)

IFSC code: BKID0006805

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Our publications

GLOOM BEHIND THE SMILE

(Archived in 7 prestigious libraries of the US, including, Harvard University and Library of Congress. It can also be accessed in MIT through Worldcat.org. Besides, it is also available for reading in Libraries and archives of Canada and Cancer Aid and Research Foundation Mumbai)  

ONE TO TANGO … RIA’S ODYSSEY

(Archived in Connemara Library, Chennai and Delhi Public Library, GOI, Ministry of Culture)

AADAB LUCKNOW … FOND MEMORIES

(Launched in Lucknow International Literary Festival 2014)

REFRACTIONS … FROM THE PRISM OF GOD

(Co-published by Cankids–Kidscan, a pan India NGO and Shravan Charity Mission, that works for Child cancer in India. The book is endorsed by Ms Preetha Reddy, MD Apollo Hospitals Group. Book was launched in Lucknow International Literary Festival 2016)

(CAN BE BOUGHT FROM ON LINE BOOK STORES OR WRITE TO US FOR COPIES)

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O MY FAIR LADY!

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  2my fair ladt

    Our formative years were full of fun and coupled to them was a careless, happy –go- lucky lifestyle that went naturally with it. The gay abandon and freedom we enjoyed was all within the family for we enjoyed doing things together. Life was simple and modes of entertainment simpler. No Cineplex, no DVDs, or play stations or speed dating. A good game of cricket followed by a refreshing ice soda, topped by a steaming cup of coffee with a bun, perhaps, was the ultimate luxury. My interest in movies as a source of entertainment was influenced by my uncle who belonged to the era of Douglas Fairbanks, Spencer Tracey, Clark Gable, Cary Grant, Gregory Peck and a host of others who gave that aura of sheer mysticism and glamour to Hollywood, which makes it what it is today. Uncle was particular about the movies we saw, especially the English movies. He out rightly discouraged the slam-bang-wham types, excepting, of course, the Westerns starring John Wayne, Gary Cooper and the ilk. Uncle acquainted us with the top genre movies including the noire category made by Hollywood. The list of films ranged from Ten Commandments, Ben Hur, My Fair Lady, The Sound of Music to Scapegoat, Stagecoach and Gunfight at O.K. Coral. However, my all time favourite is The Sound of Music. ‘Do Re Me Fa…’ , ‘I’m sixteen going on seventeen….’, oh, what numbers, simply out of this world-or mind blowing by today’s parlance. For sheer magic of music and visual excellence the movie is miles ahead of its genre.

But for unalloyed intellectual treat My Fair Lady takes the cake. Elders at home took great pains to explain the essential hypocrisy of the British and their unique trait of laughing at themselves. That, perhaps, has moulded my present opinion. Based on Pygmalion by the great English dramatist, GBS, this captivating musical, a Twentieth Century Fox Production, won the best film Oscar(1964). The name Pygmalion refers to the king of Cyprus who fell in love with a statue of his own making. The beautiful statue was bestowed with life and turned into a more beautiful maiden whom Pygmalion married, or so the story goes. Henry Higgins is an English linguistics professor without peer. He is also a misogynistic bachelor-brash, arrogant but totally committed to his work. The Covent Garden scene where he meets scruffy Eliza Dolittle, superbly portrayed by Audrey Hepburn, a common flower girl with a Cockney accent, is uniquely scripted and refreshingly filmed.

Professor Higgins takes on Eliza under his tutelage in order to transform her from a rustic flower girl to a lady who captures the majesty and grandeur of the English language with impeccable articulation. They train together and enter into a cantankerous relationship where Eliza threatens Higgins, “Just you wait Henry Higgins”. Eliza has to work unceremoniously as part of his innovative speech devices much to the anguish of Col Pickering who sympathises with the girl for the ordeals she suffers. Higgins bets with Pickering that he will be able to pass Eliza off as a Duchess in six months time. The big day finally arrives. Pretenders, masqueraders, and polyglots arrive incognito to de-mask Eliza. They tease, torment and taunt Eliza who stands unnerved by their verbal sallies. Eliza steals the show with His Majesty leading the dance with her, much like the Cindrella of the fairy tale. Eliza transcends expectations beyond measure. Higgins finds it difficult to believe in his own handiwork and concedes defeat, saying: “ I have grown accustomed to her face”.

Astonishing sets, captivating costumes and excellent photography together with immortal tunes like’ “Get me to the church in time”, “I could have danced all night” transform the movie into a classic. Down to this day the movie ranks as an all time favourite for our entire family. The supporting cast in the form of Alfred Dolittle (Stanley Holloway) in the role of Eliza’s eccentric yet charismatic father is no less endearing. Alfred delivers some of the finest lines in the film, and remains my favourite character to this day. Our own Bollywood has many a times borrowed thematic contents from Hollywood classics of the early sixties and seventies. Dil Hai Ki Manta Nahi and picked up its theme from It Happened One Night, while The Sound Of Music provided the concept for Parichay. Devanand’s Manpasand adapted substantially from My Fair Lady. In doing so the Bollywood  attempt was bold but not a patch on the great movie. However, Devanand as Higgins and Girish Karnad as Col Pickering just manage to keep the movie afloat.

Going back to my favourite, the most exciting part of the movie is where Higgins and Eliza sing the ditty “The Rain In Spain Falls Mainly in the Plain”.  Suddenly Eliza discovers that the tone, timbre and modulation of her voice have acquired the Queen’s accent. The exhilaration and joy of the Professor is a delight to watch. Even Pickering and the house maids join in the fun as the song goes on and on. The scene is one of the high point of the movie. The acerbic wit in the allegory authored by the redoubtable GBS is commendably brought out in the film which for me remains a moving experience.

A.K.Tripathi,                                                                                                                                        Guwahati-Assam

March-2015

First published in Local Area Magazine titled ‘Nava Arunodoi’ in 2009. The article has since been re-edited.