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BOOK CORNER: SAHIB’S WHO LOVED INDIA … compiled & edited by Khushwant Singh

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Khidki (Window)

–Read India Initiative—

This is only an attempt to create interest in reading. We may not get the time to read all the books in our lifetime. But such reviews, talk and synopsis will at least convey what the book is all about.

SAHIBS WHO LOVED INDIA

Compiled & edited by Khushwant Singh

    For far too long we have despised the English as unwanted rulers. Who exploited India and kept their distance from Indians.  And as soon as their tenures ended, they went back to their homes in England and were happy to forget the time they had spent in India.

This asymmetrical image of the English in India persists in the mind of most Indians. It is true that the majority of those who came here came because they could not find jobs in their own country. They hated everything about India: its climate, mosquitoes, flies, the filth and finally its dirt consummating into reek.

Plainly speaking they hated Indians. There were others who enjoyed the luxury of spacious bungalows with servants, shikar, riding, pig-sticking, drinking, dancing. But even they kept themselves aloof from Indians with their ‘whites only’ clubs.

However, there was a third variety that liked everything about India, stayed away from the racists club, went out of their way to befriend Indians and maintained contacts with them even after returning to England.

Some even lent tacit support to the freedom movement. They stayed on in India after the country gained independence, reluctantly returning to England when their bread winners retired.

Khushwant Singh was quite fortunate in knowing quite a few of this breed. Both, whom he befriended during his long years in England and those whom he got to know in India.

This book, therefore, is a collection of articles written by people who enjoyed India I would say and went back with pleasant memories.

In all there are about twenty-two articles in this book written by renowned Britishers such as Lord Mountbatten of Burma—as he calls him, Taya Zinkin—a prominent French born journalist and author. She was married to ICS officer Maurice Zinkin, J.A.K Martyn—the Head Master of Doon School and many other distinguished personalities.

The flavour that you get is quite contrasting. Like in present times you find so many Indians going abroad to work. Well … in those days of the British Raj, there were many Britishers who came to India to work. Some through the bureaucratic process and some on their own.

Initially they entered India with a lot of apprehension, of it being primitive but when they started working here they started enjoying the country. Especially, the open surroundings, the spacious bungalows and above all the warm people.

While zooming past the articles you’ll find some of them being even critical about the British establishment and the racist culture that they spread in India.

Some even disagreed with the thought process that India was not ready for ‘independence.’ That also brings me to the point that there is always a logical disconnect between the rulers and its citizenry.

It is a rare collection of essays that invites to revisit a vanished era of the sahibs and memsahibs. From Lord Mountbatten to Peggy Holroyde to Maurice and Taya Zinkin.

Britishers who lived and worked in India reminisce, about topics and points of interest as varied as the Indian Civil Service, the Roshanara Club, shikar and hazari, the amateur cine society of India, the Doon School, Rudyard Kipling and of course Mahatma Gandhi.

Selected from a series of articles commissioned by Khushwant Singh when he was editor of the illustrated weekly of India. These delightfully individualistic and refreshingly candid writings reveal a fascinating array of British attitudes, experiences, observations and fond memories. The occasional short-lived grouse and above all, a deep and abiding affection and respect for India.

It’s a less than a lengthy book of around a hundred and ninety pages full of fun. Especially, if you are interested in knowing about episodes that happened during the British Raj.

The articles are by ICS officers, journalists, technocrats, architects, teachers, BBC correspondents, government servants, army officers and bureaucrats.

I would give the book nine out of ten.

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Synopsis by Kamlesh Tripathi

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https://kamleshsujata.wordpress.com

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Shravan Charity Mission is an NGO that works for poor children suffering from life threatening diseases especially cancer. Should you wish to donate for the cause. The bank details are given below:

NAME OF ACCOUNT: SHRAVAN CHARITY MISSION

Account no: 680510110004635 (BANK OF INDIA)

IFSC code: BKID0006805

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Our publications

GLOOM BEHIND THE SMILE

(The book is about a young cancer patient. Now archived in 7 prestigious libraries of the US, including, Harvard University and Library of Congress. It can also be accessed in MIT through Worldcat.org. Besides, it is also available for reading in Libraries and archives of Canada and Cancer Aid and Research Foundation Mumbai)  

ONE TO TANGO … RIA’S ODYSSEY

(Is a book on ‘singlehood’ about a Delhi girl now archived in Connemara Library, Chennai and Delhi Public Library, GOI, Ministry of Culture, Delhi)

AADAB LUCKNOW … FOND MEMORIES

(Is a fiction written around the great city of Nawabs—Lucknow. It describes Lucknow in great detail and also talks about its Hindu-Muslim amity. That happens to be its undying characteristic. The book was launched in Lucknow International Literary Festival of 2014)

REFRACTIONS … FROM THE PRISM OF GOD

(Co-published by Cankids–Kidscan, a pan India NGO and Shravan Charity Mission, that works for Child cancer in India. The book is endorsed by Ms Preetha Reddy, MD Apollo Hospitals Group. It was launched in Lucknow International Literary Festival 2016)

TYPICAL TALE OF AN INDIAN SALESMAN

(Is a story of an Indian salesman who is, humbly qualified. Yet he fights his ways through unceasing uncertainties to reach the top. A good read not only for salesmen. The book was launched on 10th February, 2018 in Gorakhpur Lit-Fest. Now available in Amazon, Flipkart and Onlinegatha

(ALL THE ABOVE TITLES ARE AVAILABLE FOR SALE IN AMAZON, FLIPKART AND OTHER ONLINE STORES OR YOU COULD EVEN WRITE TO US FOR A COPY)

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Article: THE UNWIELDY SIZE OF NEWSPAPERS

Copyright@shravancharitymission

newspaper newspaper1 newspaper2

    When you calculate or plan the ‘capacity’ of a crowded place, in terms of a frolicking gentry in a building or a mall you normally take an area of nine square feet per person (3 x 3 feet). In Delhi Metro this painfully gets reduced to four square feet per person (2 x 2) or even less because of the huge crowd.

    In big cities and booming metros preference of real estate in terms of size has only reduced because of the size of the pocket, so much so in very expensive areas three bedrooms have become two and two have become one. Therefore, the in thing today is … single or a small-size or even a compact unit.

    In the auto industry also, sedans have become compact sedans and compact sedans have become hatchbacks. 350 CC bikes have reduced to 125 CC.

    But even with all the stinginess of shapes and sizes all around. The size of newspapers continue to remain as generous as ever and the thickness has only increased because of the boom in advertisements. 

    Now, let us for a moment run through the unwieldy size and spread of the newspaper. Take for example the size of Times of India which is 32.9 cm in width x 52.5 cm height = 13 x 21 inches respectively, which is around 210 square inches or 2.09 square feet and if you open the newspaper holding the two ends in your hands the width increases to 2.2 feet and the area to approximately 4 square feet.

    Today, India has a literacy level of 74%. Most homes subscribe to newspapers, be it in English, Hindi or any other local language. And with the rise in population the density of people living per square kilometre has also increased. Places have become overcrowded. Therefore, as a consequence people are unable to read newspapers in crowded places because of its unwieldy size, folds and pleats that are extremely inconvenient to spread, especially when the fan above you is swirling. This has led to:

  • Increase in number of subscriptions but reduction in actual reading, as most subscribers have only become ‘Head-Line’ viewers because they don’t get an opportunity to read their newspaper during the day in crowded locations to their hearts content, which is because of its onerous size and folds.
  • Most office goers would love to read newspapers in the morning while travelling to office to utilise their time effectively, in a public transport. But the unwieldy size doesn’t allow you that convenient privilege.
  • Once you are in office you are on the grind and newspaper is soon forgotten as—

SO WHAT SHOULD BE DONE

  • The size of the newspaper should be made more slim and precise so that one can open and read it in crowded niches, in metros and in other modes of public transport where even INTERNET doesn’t work, and so you can’t think of reading newspapers.
  • The correct design could be a ‘newspaper’ that could be opened and read with a single hand more like a book in crowded places.
  • One can think of compartmentalising the daily newspaper into various chapters that can be sold separately if the subscriber doesn’t want the full newspaper, for everyone doesn’t read everything in the newspaper, such as:
  • Only Headlines
  • Politics
  • Sports
  • Current affairs
  • Page 3
  • Movies and entertainment
  • Spiritual
  • Medical and Health
  • Corporate and Industry
  • Crime
  • International affairs
  • Education
  • Jobs
  • Children

    I understand the paper of the ‘newspaper’ is subsidised and the same can continue. Irrespective of the size and compartmentalised contents, as this is one of the widest and most effective ways towards a literate India. Even if GOI has to spend extra it should not mind and the citizens and the newspaper lobby should push for it.

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By Kamlesh Tripathi

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https://kamleshsujata.wordpress.com

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Share if you like it

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Shravan Charity Mission is an NGO that works for poor children suffering from life threatening diseases. Should you wish to donate for the cause the bank details are given below:

NAME OF ACCOUNT: SHRAVAN CHARITY MISSION

Account no: 680510110004635 (BANK OF INDIA)

IFSC code: BKID0006805

*

Our publications

GLOOM BEHIND THE SMILE

ONE TO TANGO … RIA’S ODYSSEY

AADAB LUCKNOW … FOND MEMORIES

REFRACTIONS … FROM THE PRISM OF GOD

(CAN BE BOUGHT FROM ON LINE BOOK STORES OR WRITE TO US FOR COPIES)

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