Tag Archives: juvenile delinquent

SHORT STORY: CHILD REMAND HOME

Copyright@shravancharitymission

    I had once gone to a child remand home, to deliver a lecture, to children who were undergoing a prison term for the crime they had committed. Most of them out there, were under eighteen. They all had innocent faces. And had you not seen them in those confines, you wouldn’t have ever believed their indulgence into, such devious affairs.

    The remand home had a strength of some two hundred children. They were kept under observation. Where, they all had a strict routine. Starting right from morning prayers, to physical exercises, to a good amount of time for their studies and even recreation. It had many classes with proper benches that I could see.

    The warden of the home, as a goodwill gesture took me around. I was enjoying the trip as it was the first of its kind for me. We finally walked into the class room. All the children got up as a mark of respect for the warden. It appeared, the class had been in progress for some time now, and I was the last faculty.

    I spent about an hour with the children. They were indeed quite bright, and I felt quite refreshed interacting with them. Finally, the class was over when these children left for their dormitories.

    But before leaving the remand home. The warden spent some time with me over a cup of tea, quite explaining the reasons for the increase in child crime rate. I was shocked when he told me the story of a child in the red shirt. His name was Ashok and he was sitting on the last bench when I was taking my class. He appeared quite healthy, tough and even mature for the age of sixteen.

    He had murdered his grandfather at the age of fourteen for which he was undergoing a sentence of three years since he was not an adult when he committed the crime. But the grapevine had something else to say, which the warden narrated to me.

   Ashok’s grandfather, Kewal Ram had sixteen acres of farm land with two sons. One happened to be Askok’s father Ghanshyam and the other, his uncle, Sukhram. Both Ghanshyam and Sukhram were pestering their father for quite some time now to sell off their farm land and buy a few shops in the city as they were not interested in farming. But Kewal Ram was not interested in selling his ancestral land. When, the discord reached a flash point. One night after drinks they killed their father and got Ashok to own up the crime since he was only fourteen then. Because, as a juvenile delinquent he would be out in just three years. Whereas, they would have gone in, for a full lifetime.

By Kamlesh Tripathi

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https://kamleshsujata.wordpress.com

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Shravan Charity Mission is an NGO that works for poor children suffering from life threatening diseases especially cancer. Should you wish to donate for the cause. The bank details are given below:

NAME OF ACCOUNT: SHRAVAN CHARITY MISSION

Account no: 680510110004635 (BANK OF INDIA)

IFSC code: BKID0006805

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Our publications

GLOOM BEHIND THE SMILE

(The book is about a young cancer patient. Now archived in 7 prestigious libraries of the US, including, Harvard University and Library of Congress. It can also be accessed in MIT through Worldcat.org. Besides, it is also available for reading in Libraries and archives of Canada and Cancer Aid and Research Foundation Mumbai)  

ONE TO TANGO … RIA’S ODYSSEY

(Is a book on ‘singlehood’ about a Delhi girl now archived in Connemara Library, Chennai and Delhi Public Library, GOI, Ministry of Culture, Delhi)

AADAB LUCKNOW … FOND MEMORIES

(Is a fiction written around the great city of Nawabs—Lucknow. It describes Lucknow in great detail and also talks about its Hindu-Muslim amity. That happens to be its undying characteristic. The book was launched in Lucknow International Literary Festival of 2014)

REFRACTIONS … FROM THE PRISM OF GOD

(Co-published by Cankids–Kidscan, a pan India NGO and Shravan Charity Mission, that works for Child cancer in India. The book is endorsed by Ms Preetha Reddy, MD Apollo Hospitals Group. It was launched in Lucknow International Literary Festival 2016)

TYPICAL TALE OF AN INDIAN SALESMAN

(Is a story of an Indian salesman who is, humbly qualified. Yet he fights his ways through unceasing uncertainties to reach the top. A good read not only for salesmen. The book was launched on 10th February, 2018 in Gorakhpur Lit-Fest. Now available in Amazon, Flipkart and Onlinegatha

(ALL THE ABOVE TITLES ARE AVAILABLE FOR SALE IN AMAZON, FLIPKART AND OTHER ONLINE STORES OR YOU COULD EVEN WRITE TO US FOR A COPY)

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CONSCIENCE & CONFESSION

Copyright@shravancharitymission

 

    It reminds me of a time when I used to go to a park every day, early in the morning. The place was still and quiet—reminding you of those dreaded words—pin drop silence. It was a long morning walk, from where I stayed and also mid-way for me. Where, I use to take a break. The park was located on the embankment of the river which was about twenty feet high from the river water and in between the two there was a steep gradient. To, secure the area from anyone, falling into the river. A rugged railing had been raised only recently. The other end of the park touched the busy road. Coming all the way from the airport and passing into the main city. Beyond the river, there was a tall dark and handsome hillock that gave a great sense of scenic fulfillment.

    All around, it was lush green, especially, during the monsoons. When, the water level at times used to rise and ripple past the edge of the gradient to enter the park. I normally sat there each day for about ten to fifteen minutes. Just for some meditation and introspection that refreshed me to take on the tough day ahead. I had relocated to the city some six months back as an Inspector in the Police Department. Out there. I also found many health freaks coming for morning walk. But some just to lollygag.

    Close to the main gate of the park. There was also a small tea stall. I guess it grossed all its major revenues, early in the morning itself, while serving the morning walkers.  Once in a while it also served hot pakodas that tasted deadly, with that hot dhaba tea.

    I had become a little pally with the tea stall owner who was young and appeared somewhat educated. There was always a newspaper lying around the stall. Where, tea buffs often rushed through the headlines and exchanged informal barbs.

    As a regular visitor I had started recognizing quite a few faces. Gradually, I even got to know the names of some. One out of them happened to be an old person. About whom I noticed, was normally quiet. One day the stall owner who knew, I was a police inspector, introduced me to him. His name was Robert.

    In a matter of days I started interacting with him and referred to him as ‘uncle.’ He must have been around seventy. He spoke very less. But whenever he did, he was to the point. He was normally in his own world and nothing amused him.

    Days passed as usual. One day he came up to me and asked,

     ‘Are you in the police?’

    I said, ‘yes.’

    ‘Then, can you do me a favour?’

     I said, ‘what favour?’ He looked at me for a while and said.

    ‘Many years back when I was young. While playing in this park I had a fight with my best friend and that unfortunately escalated. As a result of which I pushed him down the slope over there. He fell into the river. It was monsoon season. When, the river was in full spate and he was swept away, and never returned.’

    ‘So, then, did you tell the police, that you had pushed him?’

    ‘No.’

    ‘But why?’

    ‘Because I was scared I’ll be arrested. So the police registered a case of accident, that he didn’t know swimming so he drowned.’

    ‘So then, why are you telling me your story now and that too after so many years?’

    ‘After fifty years to be exact. To, clear my guilt or you could say conscience. Because, you’re in the police and if you want, you can arrest me now for the crime.’

    ‘But have you told this to anyone else?’

    ‘No.’

    ‘But why?’

    ‘Because he was my next door neighbour.’

    ‘So how does that matter?’

    ‘It matters, because, years later, I married his sister.’

    ‘But does she know you were the one who pushed his brother?’

    ‘A few years back I did tell her. She couldn’t bear the shock and expired within weeks.’

    ‘And what about your children?’

    ‘I have two sons. Both are in Australia. They don’t know about my crime. But maybe you can tell them after I’m arrested or I’m gone.’ After this he got up, picked his walking stick and started walking. Perhaps, he was heading home.

    After the conversation a couple of days had passed. I had not seen Robert. One day when I reached the tea stall. I was informed by the stall owner that Robert had committed suicide. I was shocked at the news. Perhaps, he was preparing for it mentally when he told me about his act of crime. I attended his funeral where I even got to meet his two sons Richard and Simon.

    Thereafter, I continued with my morning walk as usual. One day when I reached the tea stall. The owner gave me a sealed enveloped that Robert had left for me. I opened it. There was another sealed cover in it with the name and address of Richard in Australia with a request to send it across through a reliable courier. Which I did.

    Robert after losing his wife couldn’t have taken a chance on his sons. But anyhow he wanted to confess about his crime to his children. Which he did after he was gone.

    Moral of the story: Your conscience is the most long-lasting jury in you.

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By Kamlesh Tripathi

*

https://kamleshsujata.wordpress.com

*

Share if you like it

*

Shravan Charity Mission is an NGO that works for poor children suffering from life threatening diseases. Should you wish to donate for the cause the bank details are given below:

NAME OF ACCOUNT: SHRAVAN CHARITY MISSION

Account no: 680510110004635 (BANK OF INDIA)

IFSC code: BKID0006805

*

Our publications

GLOOM BEHIND THE SMILE

(Archived in 7 prestigious libraries of the US, including, Harvard University and Library of Congress. It can also be accessed in MIT through Worldcat.org. Besides, it is also available for reading in Libraries and archives of Canada and Cancer Aid and Research Foundation Mumbai)  

ONE TO TANGO … RIA’S ODYSSEY

(Archived in Connemara Library, Chennai and Delhi Public Library, GOI, Ministry of Culture)

AADAB LUCKNOW … FOND MEMORIES

(Launched in Lucknow International Literary Festival 2014)

REFRACTIONS … FROM THE PRISM OF GOD

(Co-published by Cankids–Kidscan, a pan India NGO and Shravan Charity Mission, that works for Child cancer in India. The book is endorsed by Ms Preetha Reddy, MD Apollo Hospitals Group. Book was launched in Lucknow International Literary Festival 2016)

(CAN BE BOUGHT FROM ON LINE BOOK STORES OR WRITE TO US FOR COPIES)

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SC: RETHINK LAW ON JUVENILES INVOLVED IN HEINOUS OFFENCES

Copyright@shravancharitymission

By Kamlesh Tripathi

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Court’s Stand Puts Pressure on Centre- Cabinet likely to take up bill

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    Supreme Court as usual has done extremely well. In coaxing the centre to have a re-look at the law. Providing mild punishment to juveniles when they are involved in heinous offences. In fact the Supreme Court has requested Parliament to differentiate between juveniles involved in innocuous and serious crimes.

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    In today’s day and age. Children mature much faster. And, from an early age of around eight to ten years they learn to handle mobiles, smart-phones, Tabs, Computers and even NET-surfing. They go global to compete with the best or the worst of the world. They do not dwell so much on the noble values of their parents. But get more influenced by the heft of materialism. The strings of loose morals that manifest in their parents and families.

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    A case in point could be Aakash in Gurgaon. Who could not be reformed as a juvenile. Recently he was held for a second murder at the age of twenty one. The first being at the age 14. When he killed his school mate with the revolver of his macho dad. That he carried to school.

    Read, the column below that appeared in TOI recently; an eye opener.

GURGAON: Gurgaon Police has arrested Aakash (21) who shot his friend dead in a city market on March 25. This was Aakash’s second murder. Seven years back, when he was only 14, Aakash had smuggled to his school – Euro International in Gurgaon — a revolver that belonged to his father’s friend and shot dead a classmate with whom he had a scrap a few days back.

According to sources, acting on a tip-off, a police team carried out a search operation around Sultanpur Lake on Sunday night and arrested Aakash alias Ashu and his three associates from a Mahindra Scorpio which was parked there. He evaded arrest so far by hiding in parts of Himachal Pradesh and then in Rohtak district. Cops recovered two illegal pistols from the vehicle. On Monday morning, all four accused were sent to three-day police remand by a city court. “All the accused have confessed to their role in the murder. We are questioning them further and hope to solve the case soon,” said Ved Prakash Godara, DCP (crime).

In his confession, Aakash reportedly told cops that Manish Kumar alias Bihari (23) repeatedly tried to kill him after a dispute over money, leaving him with no option than to kill him first in “self-defence”.
“Aakash has told us that more than a year back Manish sought his help in recovering around Rs 1.5 lakh from a third party and promised to share the money. Once Manish got the money, he refused Aakash his share and they had a fight over it. Aakash claims once Manish forcefully stopped his car with the intent of killing him but he escaped narrowly. Another such attempt was made during a friend’s wedding in Manesar,” an investigator told TOI.

Aakash then planned to kill Manish with the help of three other friends, one of whom is undergoing trial for the murder of a village sarpanch in 2011.

The three aides have been identified as Ashok alias Mental, native of Gijhi village, Manjit alias Monu, resident of Titoli village in Rohtak, and Manish alias Moga, native of Dundahera village.

While Manjit and Manish have no past crime record, Ashok is undergoing trial for the 2011 murder of Dalbeer Sarpanch of Nayagaon-Nayabas village in Rohtak.

On March 25, around 9pm, the accused came in a car and shot Manish Kumar at point blank range while he was eating momos at a stall in Sector 21 market. The victim, a native of Muzaffarpur in Bihar, himself was a history-sheeter and had been booked in several cases of murder and theft. He was recently released after serving a jail term for attempting to murder a lawyer in Kapashera.

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